Abet



to encourage, support, or countenance by aid or approval, usually in wrongdoing:
to abet a swindler; to abet a crime.
Contemporary Examples

He was there to aid and abet when Wade got hot in the fourth quarter.
The Vindication of LeBron James Buzz Bissinger May 31, 2011

Those who did so used their medical training not to care for patients, but to abet their abuse.
‘Rectal Feeding’ Has Nothing to Do with Nutrition, Everything to Do with Torture Russell Saunders December 9, 2014

To view these nudes is not quite to abet evil, but it is to undermine decency.
From ISIS Videos to JLaw Nudes, When Is Looking Abetting Evil? Michael Daly September 2, 2014

Yet, far from nudging Rajapaksa toward greater accountability, their presence in Sri Lanka is likely only to abet his rise.
Mahinda Rajapaksa and Sri Lanka’s Reign of Terror Kapil Komireddi November 14, 2013

Our political leaders need to demand that their colleague step down immediately, not aid and abet the barbarian criminal.
Did This Senator Beat Up His Girlfriend? Amy Siskind April 5, 2009

Historical Examples

That you have harbored one of the enemy, and have tried to abet his escape.
Peggy Owen and Liberty Lucy Foster Madison

Lucy smiled at the bare-faced fraud and hastened to abet it.
Hidden Water Dane Coolidge

His being there is a proof of his intent to aid and abet; else, why is he there?
The Making of Arguments J. H. Gardiner

How does abet differ from incite and instigate as to the time of the action?
English Synonyms and Antonyms James Champlin Fernald

How friendly in thee, thus to abet the favourite purpose of my heart!
Clarissa, Volume 4 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

verb abets, abetting, abetted
(transitive) to assist or encourage, esp in crime or wrongdoing
v.

late 14c. (implied in abetting), from Old French abeter “to bait, to harass with dogs,” literally “to cause to bite,” from a- “to” (see ad-) + beter “to bait,” from a Germanic source, perhaps Low Franconian betan “incite,” or Old Norse beita “cause to bite,” from Proto-Germanic *baitjan, from PIE root *bheid- “to split” (see fissure). Related: Abetted; abetting.

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  • Abetment

    to encourage, support, or countenance by aid or approval, usually in wrongdoing: to abet a swindler; to abet a crime. Historical Examples With the aid and abetment of a bottle of excellent Montrachet, however, one contrived to worry through. Red Masquerade Louis Joseph Vance Now Esther herself was offering her own abetment in almost the […]



  • Abetted

    to encourage, support, or countenance by aid or approval, usually in wrongdoing: to abet a swindler; to abet a crime. Contemporary Examples James Carroll on how the Catholic Church aided and abetted the offenders. The Vatican’s Sex Cover-up James Carroll March 10, 2010 It has deepened with each passing year, as successive governments have aided […]

  • Abetter

    a person who . Historical Examples They occasionally raised themselves on their hind-legs to get abetter view. The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals Charles Darwin It is really too bad, that the Primate of Ireland, of all men living, should be made the abetter in two fallacies. Atlantic Monthly, Volume 2, Issue 10, […]



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