Abhorred



to regard with extreme repugnance or aversion; detest utterly; loathe; abominate.
Contemporary Examples

But unlike his father, who abhorred politics, Baraka has spent most of his life in the political realm.
The Leak of a Mysterious Video Could Change the Outcome of Newark’s Mayor’s Race Charles Upton Sahm May 4, 2014

As he wrote, “When I took command of the army, I abhorred the idea of independence.”
The Militarization of America William R. Polk December 4, 2009

Though the president disliked the KKK and abhorred lynching, he took no effective steps to counter these horrors.
Does Calvin Coolidge Deserve a Reassessment? Ira Katznelson February 14, 2013

So over the years, the saga of James Gatz has been appropriated by the victors into a celebration of the very excess it abhorred.
The Great Gatsby, Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Is a Relentless Assault on the Senses Marlow Stern May 7, 2013

He required others to open doors for him because he so abhorred touching the knobs or other metal objects.
We Already Know What Adam Lanza’s Real Motive Was at Sandy Hook Michael Daly November 25, 2013

Historical Examples

On several overhanging limbs crouched wildcats and a couple of lynxes, afraid to take to the water, which they abhorred.
Red Fox Charles G. D. Roberts

It was monstrous, he abhorred it, but could no more resist it than the hasheesh eater his drug.
Melomaniacs James Huneker

He was an eminently human-hearted man, who abhorred all kinds of cant and seeming.
Lancashire Sketches Edwin Waugh

If such a man can not be loved, he can not be abhorred or despised.
Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 3, January 19, 1884. Various

Foul language on part of boy or man was something he abhorred, and Hoover had been reported more than once.
From School to Battle-field Charles King

verb -hors, -horring, -horred
(transitive) to detest vehemently; find repugnant; reject
v.

mid-15c., from Latin abhorrere “shrink back from, have an aversion for, shudder at,” from ab- “away” (see ab-) + horrere “tremble at, shudder,” literally “to bristle, be shaggy,” from PIE *ghers- “start out, stand out, rise to a point, bristle” (see horror). Related: Abhorred; abhorring.

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    a feeling of extreme repugnance or aversion; utter loathing; abomination. something or someone extremely repugnant or loathsome. Contemporary Examples For all his caustic polemics, Kristol had an abhorrence of finding himself in the minority. Glenn Beck’s Creator Lee Siegel September 25, 2009 Historical Examples Have I beheld sin with an abhorrence far greater than the […]

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    to regard with extreme repugnance or aversion; detest utterly; loathe; abominate. Historical Examples At last, the vigor and courage of one Stowel of Exeter, an abhorrer, put an end to the practice. The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part F. David Hume verb -hors, -horring, -horred (transitive) to detest vehemently; find repugnant; reject […]

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