Abide by



to remain; continue; stay:
Abide with me.
to have one’s abode; dwell; reside:
to abide in a small Scottish village.
to continue in a particular condition, attitude, relationship, etc.; last.
to put up with; tolerate; stand:
I can’t abide dishonesty!
to endure, sustain, or withstand without yielding or submitting:
to abide a vigorous onslaught.
to wait for; await:
to abide the coming of the Lord.
to accept without opposition or question:
to abide the verdict of the judges.
to pay the price or penalty of; suffer for.
abide by,

to act in accord with.
to submit to; agree to:
to abide by the court’s decision.
to remain steadfast or faithful to; keep:
If you make a promise, abide by it.

verb abides, abiding, abode, abided
(transitive) to tolerate; put up with
(transitive) to accept or submit to; suffer: to abide the court’s decision
(intransitive) foll by by

to comply (with): to abide by the decision
to remain faithful (to): to abide by your promise

(intransitive) to remain or continue
(intransitive) (archaic) to dwell
(transitive) (archaic) to await in expectation
(transitive) (archaic) to withstand or sustain; endure: to abide the onslaught
v.

Old English abidan, gebidan “remain, wait, delay, remain behind,” from ge- completive prefix (denoting onward motion; see a- (1)) + bidan “bide, remain, wait, dwell” (see bide). Originally intransitive (with genitive of the object: we abidon his “we waited for him”); transitive sense emerged in Middle English. Meaning “to put up with” (now usually negative) first recorded 1520s. Related: Abided; abiding. The historical conjugation is abide, abode, abidden, but the modern formation is now generally weak.
Accept and act in accordance with a decision or set of rules; also, remain faithful to. For example, All members must agree to abide by the club regulations, or A trustworthy man abides by his word. An older sense of the verb abide, “remain,” is still familiar in the well-known 19th-century hymn “Abide with Me,” which asks God to stay with the singer in time of trouble. [ Early 1500s ]
In addition to the idioms beginning with abide abide by also see: can’t stand (abide)

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  • Abide

    to remain; continue; stay: Abide with me. to have one’s abode; dwell; reside: to abide in a small Scottish village. to continue in a particular condition, attitude, relationship, etc.; last. to put up with; tolerate; stand: I can’t abide dishonesty! to endure, sustain, or withstand without yielding or submitting: to abide a vigorous onslaught. to […]

  • Abided

    to remain; continue; stay: Abide with me. to have one’s abode; dwell; reside: to abide in a small Scottish village. to continue in a particular condition, attitude, relationship, etc.; last. to put up with; tolerate; stand: I can’t abide dishonesty! to endure, sustain, or withstand without yielding or submitting: to abide a vigorous onslaught. to […]



  • Abided by

    to remain; continue; stay: Abide with me. to have one’s abode; dwell; reside: to abide in a small Scottish village. to continue in a particular condition, attitude, relationship, etc.; last. to put up with; tolerate; stand: I can’t abide dishonesty! to endure, sustain, or withstand without yielding or submitting: to abide a vigorous onslaught. to […]

  • Abider

    to remain; continue; stay: Abide with me. to have one’s abode; dwell; reside: to abide in a small Scottish village. to continue in a particular condition, attitude, relationship, etc.; last. to put up with; tolerate; stand: I can’t abide dishonesty! to endure, sustain, or withstand without yielding or submitting: to abide a vigorous onslaught. to […]



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