to do away with; put an end to; annul; make void:
to abolish slavery.
Contemporary Examples

He also once wrote an article calling for the abolishment of soccer.
Do We Need to Be Told How to Read? William Giraldi June 5, 2013

Just last week, Gershom Gorenberg argued in these pages for the abolishment of the chief rabbinate.
What to Make of the Chief Rabbi Results Zack Parker July 24, 2013

But this offering was rejected by activists who are pushing for new elections and an abolishment of the anti-protest laws.
Up to Speed: What’s Going on in Ukraine? Nina Strochlic February 18, 2014

Historical Examples

The Revolution was responsible for its having withered away, as it was also for the abolishment of the see of Macon.
The Cathedrals of Southern France Francis Miltoun

It indicates the way, too, for the abolishment of the peculiar institution of Utah.
The Life of John Taylor B. H. Roberts

The Constitution provides for the establishment of new ministries and the abolishment or combining of old ones.
Area Handbook for Albania Eugene K. Keefe

Half for the temple and half for himself; and the abolishment of the seven leopards.
The Adventures of Kathlyn Harold MacGrath

They denounced it as class legislation unjustly favoring the few, and urged its abolishment.
Manual of Ship Subsidies Edwin M. Bacon

They did not ask for the abolishment of classification based upon merit, age or experience.
The Great Strike on the ‘Q’ John A. Hall

Whenever you hear of a Clancy obstructin’ the abolishment of existin’ governments you may notify me by return mail.’
Cabbages and Kings O. Henry

(transitive) to do away with (laws, regulations, customs, etc); put an end to

mid-15c., from Middle French aboliss-, present participle stem of abolir “to abolish” (15c.), from Latin abolere “destroy, cause to die out, retard the growth of,” perhaps from ab- “from” (see ab-) + adolere “to grow,” from PIE *ol-eye-, causative of root *al- “to grow, nourish” (see old), and perhaps formed as an antonym to adolere. But the Latin word rather could be from a root in common with Greek ollymi, apollymi “destroy.” Tucker writes that there has been a confusion of forms in Latin, based on similar roots, one meaning “to grow,” the other “to destroy.” Application to persons and concrete objects has long been obsolete. Related: Abolished; abolishing.


Read Also:

  • Abolition

    the act of : the abolition of war. the state of being ; annulment; abrogation: the abolition of unjust laws; the abolition of unfair taxes. the legal prohibition and ending of slavery, especially of slavery of blacks in the U.S. Contemporary Examples There is no goal of the abolition of the State of Israel, or […]

  • Abolitionize

    to convert (persons, a region, a state, etc.) to abolitionism. Historical Examples It will abolitionize the Border Slave States—it will brand our institution. The Suppression of the African Slave Trade to the United States of America W. E. B. Du Bois They had proposed by the ballot box to abolitionize at least that portion of […]

  • Abolitionism

    the principle or policy of , especially of slavery of blacks in the U.S. Historical Examples His abolitionism was secondary to his main mission, his main enthusiasm. Emerson and Other Essays John Jay Chapman By Jove, if abolitionism can make your grandma run, I’ll forgive it a lot! Pirate Gold Frederic Jesup Stimson First, then, […]

  • Abolitionist

    (especially prior to the Civil War) a person who advocated or supported the of slavery in the U.S. a person who favors the of any law or practice deemed harmful to society: the abolitionists who are opposed to capital punishment. Contemporary Examples As Brookhiser fully appreciates—he does not equivocate or run from the truth—Lincoln was […]

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