Abounded



to occur or exist in great quantities or numbers:
a stream in which trout abound.
to be rich or well supplied (usually followed by in):
The region abounds in coal.
to be filled; teem (usually followed by with):
The ship abounds with rats.
Contemporary Examples

October saw the industry shrink; layoffs and closures abounded.
One Reason Magazines Are Suffering: Their Covers James Danziger October 31, 2008

Themes of armed resistance and solidarity between Africans and Indians abounded on the many costumes.
Mardi Gras Indian Chief Larry Bannock’s Final Ride Jason Berry May 15, 2014

In nearby Mentor, Ohio, outside East Cleveland, broken children like Sladjana abounded.
Life and Death at Suicide High Lucinda Franks March 30, 2010

Misconceptions and preconceived notions about Afghanistan abounded.
Khaled Hosseini: How I Write Noah Charney November 6, 2012

This is a far cry from the 50s and 60s, when California abounded in new owner-occupied single family homes.
California’s New Feudalism Benefits a Few at the Expense of the Multitude Joel Kotkin October 4, 2013

Historical Examples

They abounded with deep nullahs, or ravines, with abrupt banks of a clayey nature.
Memoirs of the Extraordinary Military Career of John Shipp John Shipp

Money, moreover, was thrown into it; gifts to the Blessed Virgin abounded.
The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete Emile Zola

This plain was covered with wild indigo, and abounded with peafowl.
The Rifle and The Hound in Ceylon Samuel White Baker

The Temple was chiefly remarkable for the dirt which abounded.
The Last Voyage Lady (Annie Allnutt) Brassey

It was supposed to have abounded in golden mines in some parts of it.
Trips to the Moon Lucian

verb (intransitive)
to exist or occur in abundance; be plentiful: a swamp in which snakes abound
foll by with or in. to be plentifully supplied (with); teem (with): the gardens abound with flowers, the fields abound in corn
v.

early 14c., from Old French abonder “to abound, be abundant, come together in great numbers” (12c.), from Latin abundare “overflow, run over,” from Latin ab- “off” (see ab-) + undare “rise in a wave,” from unda “water, wave” (see water (n.)). Related: Abounded; abounding.

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  • Abounding

    to occur or exist in great quantities or numbers: a stream in which trout abound. to be rich or well supplied (usually followed by in): The region abounds in coal. to be filled; teem (usually followed by with): The ship abounds with rats. Contemporary Examples Soon, theories were abounding in the blogosphere about the motivation […]

  • About

    of; concerning; in regard to: instructions about the work; a book about the Civil War. connected or associated with: There was an air of mystery about him. near; close to: a man about my height; about six o’clock. in or somewhere near: He is about the house. on every side of; around: the railing about […]



  • About face

    (used as a military command to perform an about-face). Military. a turn of 180° from the position of attention. a complete, sudden change in position, direction, principle, attitude, etc.: They’ve done an about-face in their foreign policy. to execute an about face. to turn in the opposite direction. to switch to an opposite opinion.

  • About ship

    (as a command) put the ship about. Nautical. to tack. verb -ships, -shipping, -shipped (intransitive) (nautical) to manoeuvre a vessel onto a new tack



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