Abridge



to shorten by omissions while retaining the basic contents:
to abridge a reference book.
to reduce or lessen in duration, scope, authority, etc.; diminish; curtail:
to abridge a visit; to abridge one’s freedom.
to deprive; cut off.
Contemporary Examples

At the right time and in the right dose, it can ease and abridge economic maladies.
The Green Stimulus’ Red Ink David Frum December 2, 2012

Historical Examples

Why abridge our native freedom, when, in every instance, the utmost exertion of it is found innocent and beneficial?
An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals David Hume

We must not abridge the liberties of the press or the people.
Abraham Lincoln William Eleroy Curtis

During the reign of Anne, the enemies of Dissent exerted themselves to abridge their liberties.
Memorials of the Independent Churches in Northamptonshire Thomas Coleman

If an attempt be made to abridge that power, they preach arms and rebellion.
Christianity Unveiled Nicolas-Antoine Boulanger

It is an averment of a conclusion of law which is permitted to abridge the facts (positive and negative) on which it is founded.
The Common Law Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

I find that I must abridge, by abstaining from the reading of extracts.
The Life of Jefferson Davis Frank H. Alfriend

How can the State deny or abridge the right of the citizen, if the citizen does not possess it?
The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 2 of 2) Ida Husted Harper

The second section I must abridge, for I cannot transcribe much more.
Novanglus, and Massachusettensis John Adams

In this way all power of the individual states to abridge the political rights of the negro was taken away.
The Modern Woman’s Rights Movement Kaethe Schirmacher

verb (transitive)
to reduce the length of (a written work) by condensing or rewriting
to curtail; diminish
(archaic) to deprive of (privileges, rights, etc)
v.

c.1300, abreggen, “to make shorter, to condense,” from Old French abregier “abridge, diminish, shorten,” from Late Latin abbreviare “make short” (see abbreviate). The sound development from Latin -vi- to French -dg- is paralleled in assuage (from assuavidare) and deluge (from diluvium). Related: Abridged; abridging.

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  • Abridged

    to shorten by omissions while retaining the basic contents: to abridge a reference book. to reduce or lessen in duration, scope, authority, etc.; diminish; curtail: to abridge a visit; to abridge one’s freedom. to deprive; cut off. Contemporary Examples Undaunted, Jason translated that himself too — which he then abridged. The Voice of Proust David […]

  • Abridgment

    a shortened or condensed form of a book, speech, etc., that still retains the basic contents: an abridgment of Tolstoy’s War and Peace. the act or process of . the state of being . reduction or curtailment: abridgment of civil rights. Contemporary Examples Those words are an abridgment and paraphrase of this assessment by the […]



  • Abridgement

    a shortened or condensed form of a book, speech, etc., that still retains the basic contents: an abridgment of Tolstoy’s War and Peace. the act or process of . the state of being . reduction or curtailment: abridgment of civil rights. Historical Examples Notwithstanding the abridgement of their rights, a great many of the Jews […]

  • Abridging

    to shorten by omissions while retaining the basic contents: to abridge a reference book. to reduce or lessen in duration, scope, authority, etc.; diminish; curtail: to abridge a visit; to abridge one’s freedom. to deprive; cut off. Contemporary Examples If you did, you would see the text states that “Congress shall make no law…abridging the […]



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