Abrogate



to abolish by formal or official means; annul by an authoritative act; repeal:
to abrogate a law.
to put aside; put an end to.
Contemporary Examples

“The government cannot just abrogate contracts,” Larry Summers said yesterday.
Give the Bonuses Back—Or Else Matt Miller March 15, 2009

Historical Examples

Why should the ruling classes seek to abrogate the treaties and defy foreign powers?
Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No 3, September 1863 Various

As not having imposed, she cannot abrogate, suspend, or modify them.
Historical Sketches, Volume I (of 3) John Henry Newman

If the law is going to enter private houses and abrogate domestic authority, where the hell shall we be?
A Family Man (From the Fifth Series Plays) John Galsworthy

They make no laws, they consent to none, they abrogate none.
The College, the Market, and the Court Caroline H. Dall

And Virchow’s first step, according to the principles he now declares, must be a motion to abrogate this paragraph.
Freedom in Science and Teaching. Ernst Haeckel

No one can invalidate his sentence; he can abrogate those of all others.
Monks, Popes, and their Political Intrigues John Alberger

He cannot abrogate a law both divine and natural, and I doubt——’
Ten Years Near the German Frontier Maurice Francis Egan

This is a common enough doctrine in Europe and a difficult one to abrogate.
Command William McFee

Will not every additional tax therefore render it more difficult to abrogate any of them?
Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania to the Inhabitants of the British Colonies John Dickinson

verb
(transitive) to cancel or revoke formally or officially; repeal; annul
v.

1520s, from Latin abrogatus, past participle of abrogare “to annul, repeal (a law),” from ab- “away” (see ab-) + rogare “propose a law, request” (see rogation). Form abrogen, from Old French abroger, is recorded from early 15c. Related: Abrogated; abrogating.

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    to abolish by formal or official means; annul by an authoritative act; repeal: to abrogate a law. to put aside; put an end to. Historical Examples To this, Russia replied, by declaring the Concordat of 1867 abrogated. History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science John William Draper The charter had been abrogated, but the […]

  • Abrogation

    the act or an instance of , or repealing: abrogation of the treaty’s responsibility. Historical Examples Most important among them is the enactment, interpretation, suspension, and abrogation of all laws of the republic. The Governments of Europe Frederic Austin Ogg Demand for abrogation of Partition is tantamount to demand for Home Rule. Indian Home Rule […]



  • Abrogator

    to abolish by formal or official means; annul by an authoritative act; repeal: to abrogate a law. to put aside; put an end to. verb (transitive) to cancel or revoke formally or officially; repeal; annul v. 1520s, from Latin abrogatus, past participle of abrogare “to annul, repeal (a law),” from ab- “away” (see ab-) + […]

  • Abronah

    abronah R.V., one of Israel’s halting-places in the desert (Num.33:34,35), just before Ezion-gaber. In A.V., “Ebronah.”



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