Acanthus



any of several plants of the genus Acanthus, of the Mediterranean region, having spiny or toothed leaves and showy, white or purplish flowers.
Compare .
an architectural ornament, as in the Corinthian capital, resembling the leaves of this plant.
Historical Examples

The mould grows up, and hides the capital of the fallen column; the acanthus is hidden in earth.
Amaryllis at the Fair Richard Jefferies

Theocritus speaks of a prize cup as having a crust of soft acanthus.
Plant Lore, Legends, and Lyrics Richard Folkard

With the acanthus and scroll as their principal units of design, they elaborated and enriched every form that would admit of it.
Scientific American Supplement, No. 598, June 18, 1887 Various

The acanthus leaf was the inspiration of the architect who built the Acropolis.
The Art of Entertaining M. E. W. Sherwood

It used religious symbols extensively, but incorporated in its ornament a few pagan elements, such as the acanthus and the scroll.
Scientific American Supplement, No. 598, June 18, 1887 Various

acanthus carduifolius is the choicest camel-fodder in the desert.
The Highlands of Ethiopia William Cornwallis Harris

It has a greater resemblance to the acanthus plant than it has to any solar disk imaginable.
The Swastika Thomas Wilson

Among them are large statues exceedingly well made, images of smaller size, and flowers and acanthus leaves gracefully carved.
Ten Books on Architecture Vitruvius

This basket happened to be placed just above the root of an acanthus.
Ten Books on Architecture Vitruvius

The tamarisk appears afterwards to have given the idea of a subdivision of leaf more pure and quaint than that of the acanthus.
The Stones of Venice, Volume I (of 3) John Ruskin

noun (pl) -thuses, -thi (-θaɪ)
any shrub or herbaceous plant of the genus Acanthus, native to the Mediterranean region but widely cultivated as ornamental plants, having large spiny leaves and spikes of white or purplish flowers: family Acanthaceae See also bear’s-breech
a carved ornament based on the leaves of the acanthus plant, esp as used on the capital of a Corinthian column
n.

1660s, from Latin acanthus, from Greek akanthos, from ake “point, thorn” (see acrid) + anthos “flower” (see anther). So called for its large spiny leaves. A conventionalized form of the leaf is used in Corinthian capitals.

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    any of several plants of the genus Acanthus, of the Mediterranean region, having spiny or toothed leaves and showy, white or purplish flowers. Compare . an architectural ornament, as in the Corinthian capital, resembling the leaves of this plant. adjective of or resembling an acanthus decorated with acanthus leaves noun (pl) -thuses, -thi (-θaɪ) any […]



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