Accompany



to go along or in company with; join in action:
to accompany a friend on a walk.
to be or exist in association or company with:
Thunder accompanies lightning.
to put in company with; cause to be or go along; associate (usually followed by with):
He accompanied his speech with gestures.
Music. to play or sing an to or for.
to provide the musical .
Contemporary Examples

He soon had a following and invited one young man to accompany him as he preached the gospel.
The Pope Francis’ Homeless Fans Michael Daly March 13, 2013

The coroner would also note the tiny hemorrhages that accompany strangulation.
Indiana Serial Killer’s Confession Was Just the Start Michael Daly October 20, 2014

To accompany the bird, rich creamy and buttery mashed potatoes are a must.
Turkey Day Bacchanal Christopher Idone November 22, 2009

In the meantime, Moss would also accompany his mother to work at her graphic design agency.
Olly Moss: The Savior of Movie Posters Marlow Stern May 8, 2011

Hurley did not accompany Shackleton on the dash to South Georgia.
Polar Explorer vs. Reality TV Crew: Tim Jarvis in the Footsteps of Shackleton Darrell Hartman January 11, 2014

Historical Examples

This apparition surprised me, because it seemed to accompany me.
The Memoires of Casanova, Complete Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

The sauce to use depends on the dessert that it is to accompany.
Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 4 Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

Pedro, Ned, and I were invited by the cacique to accompany him.
Manco, the Peruvian Chief W.H.G. Kingston

He had felt relieved rather than disappointed when Yates refused to accompany him.
In the Midst of Alarms Robert Barr

Pauline has been with me several times, and is always delighted to accompany me there.
Cora and The Doctor Harriette Newell Baker

verb -nies, -nying, -nied
(transitive) to go along with, so as to be in company with or escort
(transitive) foll by with. to supplement: the food is accompanied with a very hot mango pickle
(transitive) to occur, coexist, or be associated with
to provide a musical accompaniment for (a performer)
v.

early 15c., “to be in company with,” from Middle French accompagner, from Old French acompaignier (12c.) “take as a companion,” from à “to” (see ad-) + compaignier, from compaign (see companion). Related: Accompanied; accompanying.

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  • Accompanying

    to go along or in company with; join in action: to accompany a friend on a walk. to be or exist in association or company with: Thunder accompanies lightning. to put in company with; cause to be or go along; associate (usually followed by with): He accompanied his speech with gestures. Music. to play or […]

  • Accompanyist

    . Historical Examples The accompanyist would, we may assume, do likewise with his pianoforte part, and in this way a perfect ensemble would be secured. Advice to Singers Frederick James Crowest Since other gentlemen are not more obsequious in gallantry, I hereby tender myself for honour of accompanyist and vade mecum. Baboo Jabberjee, B.A. F. […]



  • Accomplice

    a person who knowingly helps another in a crime or wrongdoing, often as a subordinate. Contemporary Examples Yes, and this one hand, which will always be mine, is the hand of my accomplice. ‘The Trial’ & More Top Film Adaptations of Literary Classics (VIDEO) Jimmy So November 23, 2012 But everything goes wrong right from […]

  • Accomplish

    to bring to its goal or conclusion; carry out; perform; finish: to accomplish one’s mission. to complete (a distance or period of time): to have accomplished the age of 70; We accomplished the journey in little more than an hour. Archaic. to provide polish to; perfect. Contemporary Examples We are going to decide what it […]



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