Accomplice



a person who knowingly helps another in a crime or wrongdoing, often as a subordinate.
Contemporary Examples

Yes, and this one hand, which will always be mine, is the hand of my accomplice.
‘The Trial’ & More Top Film Adaptations of Literary Classics (VIDEO) Jimmy So November 23, 2012

But everything goes wrong right from the start with one accomplice running out the door, unable to go through with it.
Making ‘The Dog’: The Amazing True Story Behind ‘Dog Day Afternoon’ Allison Berg and Frank Keraudren August 9, 2014

Similarly, Mike Rogers has suggested Snowden probably had an accomplice in the NSA giving him information.
Snowden’s Beijing Benefactors? Gordon G. Chang January 2, 2014

It drags you down to their level and makes you an accomplice to their crimes.
Boycott Putin, Not the Sochi Olympics Garry Kasparov August 14, 2013

It has become an accomplice to diamond laundering—whereby dirty diamonds are mixed in with clean gems.
London NGO Quits the Kimberley Process Over Thriving Blood-Diamond Trade Greg Campbell December 6, 2011

Historical Examples

His constant run of good fortune was the accomplice of his immorality.
History of the Girondists, Volume I Alphonse de Lamartine

The cornet hesitated for a little, and then told his uncle the name of his accomplice.
Henry Dunbar M. E. Braddon

Returning to his seat, the accomplice is called into the room and handed the sheet of paper.
School, Church, and Home Games George O. Draper

The first wife who bore my name was my accomplice, the second was a poisoner.
The Son of Monte-Cristo, Volume I (of 2) Alexandre Dumas pre

They were there to arrest him, for killing one of their comrades on the night before, or being an accomplice in the act!
The Bandolero Mayne Reid

noun
a person who helps another in committing a crime
n.

1580s (earlier complice, late 15c.), from Old French complice “a confederate,” from Late Latin complicem (nominative complex) “partner, confederate,” from Latin complicare “fold together” (see complicate). With parasitic a- on model of accomplish, etc., or perhaps by assimilation of indefinite article in phrase a complice.

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  • Accomplish

    to bring to its goal or conclusion; carry out; perform; finish: to accomplish one’s mission. to complete (a distance or period of time): to have accomplished the age of 70; We accomplished the journey in little more than an hour. Archaic. to provide polish to; perfect. Contemporary Examples We are going to decide what it […]

  • Accomplishable

    to bring to its goal or conclusion; carry out; perform; finish: to accomplish one’s mission. to complete (a distance or period of time): to have accomplished the age of 70; We accomplished the journey in little more than an hour. Archaic. to provide polish to; perfect. verb (transitive) to manage to do; achieve to conclude […]



  • Accomplished

    completed; done; effected: an accomplished fact. highly skilled; expert: an accomplished pianist. having all the social graces, manners, and other attainments of polite society. to bring to its goal or conclusion; carry out; perform; finish: to accomplish one’s mission. to complete (a distance or period of time): to have accomplished the age of 70; We […]

  • Accomplisher

    to bring to its goal or conclusion; carry out; perform; finish: to accomplish one’s mission. to complete (a distance or period of time): to have accomplished the age of 70; We accomplished the journey in little more than an hour. Archaic. to provide polish to; perfect. Historical Examples He is at once seer, creator, accomplisher, […]



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