Accuser



a person who , especially in a court of law:
a trial in which the accuser and accused may freely speak.
Contemporary Examples

accuser No. 3, a stocky brunette with what appeared to be a permanently knitted brow, said he first met Sandusky in 1999.
Jerry Sandusky Trial, Day Three: The Defense Gets Steamrolled Diane Dimond June 13, 2012

Courts always take the side of the accuser, they’re well-known for it.
How Legitimate Was My Rape? Justin Green August 19, 2012

The scandal took an ugly turn Sunday when an audio tape between Fine’s wife, Laurie, and an accuser became public.
Syracuse Struggles to Contain Sex-Abuse Scandal The Daily Beast November 27, 2011

At the same time, at least one person who knows and admires the accuser describe her as devastated.
Ray Kelly’s Bad Week: NYPD Chief Sees Son Greg Accused of Rape Michael Daly January 26, 2012

Any accusation is guaranteed to bring media scrutiny, and the accuser risks ostracization on campus.
Joe Paterno’s Troubling Attitude Toward Sex Charges Nick Summers November 11, 2011

Historical Examples

I have already mentioned in the rules for the exordium how the accuser might conciliate the judges.
The Training of a Public Speaker Grenville Kleiser

I pass over that it becomes not an emperor to be an accuser.
The Formation of Christendom, Volume VI Thomas W. (Thomas William) Allies

The accused had become the accuser.115 There was something stirring, something righteous, in this fine abandon.
Tom Slade’s Double Dare Percy Keese Fitzhugh

Me you have killed because you wanted to escape the accuser, and not to give an account of your lives.
Apology Plato

I am certain she has it somewhere on her person,’ remarked the accuser. ‘
City Crimes Greenhorn

Satan is styled the “accuser of the brethren” (Rev. 12:10. Comp. Job 1:6; Zech. 3:1), as seeking to uphold his influence among men by bringing false charges against Christians, with the view of weakening their influence and injuring the cause with which they are identified. He was regarded by the Jews as the accuser of men before God, laying to their charge the violations of the law of which they were guilty, and demanding their punishment. The same Greek word, rendered “accuser,” is found in John 8:10 (but omitted in the Revised Version); Acts 23:30, 35; 24:8; 25:16, 18, in all of which places it is used of one who brings a charge against another.

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  • Accusing

    to charge with the fault, offense, or crime (usually followed by of): He accused him of murder. to find fault with; blame. to make an . Contemporary Examples Black gays, in turn, are accusing their white gay peers of viscous racism. Gays and Blacks (and Gay Blacks) Go to War The Daily Beast November 5, […]

  • Accusingly

    to charge with the fault, offense, or crime (usually followed by of): He accused him of murder. to find fault with; blame. to make an . Historical Examples She rose up in alarm, but something in his smile made her sit down and eye him accusingly. Wunpost Dane Coolidge Brother,” the parson answered, accusingly, “it […]



  • Accustomed

    customary; usual; habitual: in their accustomed manner. habituated; acclimated (usually followed by to): accustomed to staying up late; accustomed to the noise of the subway. to familiarize by custom or use; habituate: to accustom oneself to cold weather. Contemporary Examples There was a busy, bustling, disputatious tone about it, instead of the accustomed phlegm and […]

  • Accustom

    to familiarize by custom or use; habituate: to accustom oneself to cold weather. Historical Examples He had to instruct them to row together, and to accustom the port oarsmen to pull starboard from time to time. On the Spanish Main John Masefield At its foot he stopped and tried to accustom his eyes to the […]



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