Acerbate



to make sour or bitter.
to exasperate.
.
Historical Examples

The poor girl had not spirit sufficient to upbraid her friend; nor did it suit her now to acerbate an enemy.
The Way We Live Now Anthony Trollope

Lady Laura had triumphed; but she had no desire to acerbate her husband by any unpalatable allusion to her victory.
Phineas Finn Anthony Trollope

verb (transitive)
to embitter or exasperate
to make sour or bitter

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  • Acerbic

    sour or astringent in taste: Lemon juice is acerbic. harsh or severe, as of temper or expression: acerbic criticism. Contemporary Examples Much of it tastes like acerbic carbonated water with a dose of sugar to take the edge off. Beyond Champagne Sophie Menin December 28, 2010 But Tom Boswell makes it all look easy, gliding […]

  • Acerbically

    sour or astringent in taste: Lemon juice is acerbic. harsh or severe, as of temper or expression: acerbic criticism. adjective harsh, bitter, or astringent; sour adj. 1865, originally, and usually, figurative: “sour, harsh, severe” (of speech, manners, etc.), from Latin acerbus “harsh to the taste, sharp, bitter, sour” (see acerbity) + -ic.



  • Acerbity

    sourness, with roughness or astringency of taste. harshness or severity, as of temper or expression. Historical Examples “Thank ye kindly,” the big man replied with some acerbity, and plunged out into the darkness and rain. Bob, Son of Battle Alfred Ollivant After a time Mern suggested with acerbity that Craig was incoherent. Joan of Arc […]

  • Acerophobia

    noun a fear of sourness Word Origin Latin acerbus ‘sour’



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