Acquaint



to make more or less familiar, aware, or conversant (usually followed by with):
to acquaint the mayor with our plan.
to furnish with knowledge; inform (usually followed by with):
to acquaint the manager with one’s findings.
to bring into social contact; introduce (usually followed by with):
She acquainted her roommate with my cousin.
Historical Examples

The purpose is to acquaint the general reader with the leading facts.
Gorillas & Chimpanzees R. L. Garner

I will acquaint you with what passed at the general leave given me to be your guest.
Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

I quitted him to write to my friend, whom I, at length, judged it necessary to acquaint with his situation.
Memoirs of Emma Courtney Mary Hays

I will acquaint you, as you desire, with all that passes between Mr. Lovelace and me.
Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

The Gibeonites sent at once the most urgent message to acquaint Joshua with their danger, and Joshua as promptly replied.
The Astronomy of the Bible E. Walter Maunder

If they take notice of me in them, I wonder that he did not acquaint me with the contents.
Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

He was coming to the castle, but how was she to acquaint him with the true state of affairs?
Castle Craneycrow George Barr McCutcheon

I assured M. de ——— that I should acquaint Madame with the affair, who would, no doubt, feel very grateful for the communication.
The Secret Memoirs of Louis XV./XVI, Complete Madame du Hausset, an “Unknown English Girl” and the Princess Lamballe

But do not waste your time in stopping to acquaint Bala Khan.
The Adventures of Kathlyn Harold MacGrath

I have decided to acquaint you with some of the details of one or two of my experiments.
Astounding Stories of Super-Science, March 1930 Various

verb (transitive)
foll by with or of. to make (a person) familiar or conversant (with); inform (of)
(foll by with) (mainly US) to introduce (to); bring into contact (with)
v.

early 13c., from Old French acointier “make known, make acquaintance of,” from Vulgar Latin accognitare “to make known,” from Latin accognitus “acquainted with,” past participle of accognoscere “know well,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + cognitus, past participle of cogniscere “come to know,” from com- “with” (see com-) + gnoscere “know” (see notice). Originally reflective, “to make oneself known;” sense of “to gain for oneself personal knowledge of” is from early 14c. Related: Acquainted; acquainting.

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    rape committed by a person who is acquainted with the victim. Contemporary Examples Non-stranger rape or acquaintance rape is real and happens every day in America. The Real Victims in Rape Cases Like Greg Kelly’s Rikki Klieman January 29, 2012 These were, remember, college students in an age of widespread awareness of acquaintance rape. Sex, […]



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    noun impulsive aggressive behaviour towards someone with whom the attacker has been in contact

  • Acquaintanceship

    a person known to one, but usually not a close friend. the state of being or casually familiar with someone or something: As far as I know, no one of my acquaintance has traveled around the world. personal knowledge as a result of study, experience, etc.: a good acquaintance with French wines. (used with a […]



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