Acuminate



Botany, Zoology. pointed; tapering to a point.
to make sharp or keen.
Historical Examples

Pinnæ lanceolate, acuminate, the lowest pair deflexed and standing forward; cut into oblong, obtuse segments.
The Fern Lover’s Companion George Henry Tilton

Anterior surface of cell studded with minute acuminate papillae; posterior surface smooth, sometimes spotted.
Narrative Of The Voyage Of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By The Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During The Years 1846-1850. Including Discoveries And Surveys In New Guinea, The Louisiade Archipelago, Etc. To Which Is Added The Account Of Mr. E.B. Kennedy’s Expedition For The Exploration Of The Cape York Peninsula. By John Macgillivray, F.R.G.S. Naturalist To The Expedition. In Two Volumes. Volume 1. John MacGillivray

The distal end is usually sharply acute, but may approach an acuminate type.
Handbook of Alabama Archaeology: Part I Point Types James W. Cambron

Bill almost straight, acuminate; tail of moderate length, emarginate and rounded.
A Synopsis of the Birds of North America John James Audubon

Leaves much smaller, less oblique at the base, finely and regularly crenate, acuminate rather than cuspidate.
Woodland Gleanings Charles Tilt

Bill rather slender; feathers of the crown and occiput elongated, of the fore part of the back much elongated and acuminate.
A Synopsis of the Birds of North America John James Audubon

The second glume is about 1/3 the length of the third glume, lanceolate, acuminate, 3-nerved.
A Handbook of Some South Indian Grasses Rai Bahadur K. Ranga Achariyar

Eighty-four percent of the distal ends are acute and 16 are acuminate.
Handbook of Alabama Archaeology: Part I Point Types James W. Cambron

acuminate, Pointed, or Taper-pointed, when the summit is more or less prolonged into a narrowed or tapering point; as in Fig. 133.
The Elements of Botany Asa Gray

The leaves of this one were heart-shaped and acuminate, its stem sinuous, and its flowers of a dark purple colour.
The Quadroon Mayne Reid

adjective (əˈkjuːmɪnɪt; -ˌneɪt)
narrowing to a sharp point, as some types of leaf
verb (əˈkjuːmɪˌneɪt)
(transitive) to make pointed or sharp

acuminate a·cu·mi·nate (ə-kyōō’mə-nĭt, -nāt’)
adj.
Tapering to a point; pointed.

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  • Acuminated

    Botany, Zoology. pointed; tapering to a point. to make sharp or keen. Historical Examples The lesions begin as pin-head, waxy-looking, rounded or acuminated elevations, gradually attaining the size of small peas. Essentials of Diseases of the Skin Henry Weightman Stelwagon Spire slightly produced, acuminated; the whorls with a central indented line. Zoological Illustrations, Volume I […]

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    a type of massage in which finger on the specific bodily sites described in therapy is used to promote healing, alleviate fatigue, etc. Medicine/Medical. a procedure for stopping blood flow from an injured blood vessel. Contemporary Examples Elastic bracelets—with brads to place just so in an acupressure spot on the inner wrist purported to reduce […]



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