Acuteness



sharp or severe in effect; intense:
acute sorrow; an acute pain.
extremely great or serious; crucial; critical:
an acute shortage of oil.
(of disease) brief and severe (opposed to ).
sharp or penetrating in intellect, insight, or perception:
an acute observer.
extremely sensitive even to slight details or impressions:
acute eyesight.
sharp at the end; ending in a point.
Geometry.

(of an angle) less than 90°.
(of a triangle) containing only acute angles.

consisting of, indicated by, or bearing the mark ´, placed over vowel symbols in some languages to show that the vowels or the syllables they are in are pronounced in a certain way, as in French that the quality of an e so marked is close; in Hungarian that the vowel is long; in Spanish that the marked syllable bears the word accent; in Ibo that it is pronounced with high tones; or in classical Greek, where the mark originated, that the syllable bears the word accent and is pronounced, according to the ancient grammarians, with raised pitch (opposed to ):
the acute accent; an acute e.
the acute accent.
Historical Examples

His perception was still exceptionally alert, its acuteness left over, apparently, from the earlier days of pain and jealousy.
The Wave Algernon Blackwood

I leave time and method of explanation to your own judgment and acuteness.
Alice, or The Mysteries, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton

In this letter, Randal, despite all his acuteness, could not detect the honest compunction of the writer.
My Novel, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton

The acuteness of the pain in his head set his mind almost wandering.
The Night Riders Ridgwell Cullum

The acuteness of the early observers enabled them to single out the more important of the wanderers which we now call planets.
Great Astronomers R. S. Ball

Men like the problem that they fancy they have unravelled by their own acuteness.
The Bramleighs Of Bishop’s Folly Charles James Lever

He pined away under the acuteness of his sufferings, and just after the news came to him that his daughter Mary was born, he died.
Mary Queen of Scots, Makers of History Jacob Abbott

The speech was made and answered with an acuteness which we were not prepared for.
Canada and the Canadians Sir Richard Henry Bonnycastle

He was taken immediately to the hospital, and no one can imagine the acuteness of his sufferings, after he became sensible.
Recollections of Windsor Prison; John Reynolds.

Escape he did, thanks to his own strength of will, and his wife’s acuteness and devotion.
Captain Mansana and Mother’s Hands Bjrnstjerne Bjrnson

adjective
penetrating in perception or insight
sensitive to details; keen
of extreme importance; crucial
sharp or severe; intense: acute pain, an acute drought
having a sharp end or point
(maths)

(of an angle) less than 90°
(of a triangle) having all its interior angles less than 90°

(of a disease)

arising suddenly and manifesting intense severity
of relatively short duration Compare chronic (sense 2)

(phonetics)

(of a vowel or syllable in some languages with a pitch accent, such as ancient Greek) spoken or sung on a higher musical pitch relative to neighbouring syllables or vowels
of or relating to an accent (´) placed over vowels, denoting that the vowel is pronounced with higher musical pitch (as in ancient Greek), with a certain special quality (as in French), etc Compare (for senses 8a, 8b) grave, circumflex

(of a hospital, hospital bed, or ward) intended to accommodate short-term patients with acute illnesses
noun
an acute accent
adj.

late 14c., originally of fevers and diseases, “coming and going quickly” (opposed to a chronic), from Latin acutus “sharp, pointed,” figuratively “shrill, penetrating; intelligent, cunning,” past participle of acuere “sharpen” (see acuity). Meaning “sharp, irritating” is from early 15c. Meaning “intense” is from 1727. Related: Acutely; acuteness.

acute a·cute (ə-kyōōt’)
adj.

Pointed at the end; sharp.

Of or relating to a disease or a condition with a rapid onset and a short, severe course.

Of or relating to a patient afflicted with such a disease.

acute
(ə-kyt’)

Reacting readily to stimuli or impressions, as hearing or eyesight; sensitive.

Relating to an illness that has a rapid onset and follows a short but severe course. Compare chronic.

Having an acute angle.

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  • Acutes

    sharp or severe in effect; intense: acute sorrow; an acute pain. extremely great or serious; crucial; critical: an acute shortage of oil. (of disease) brief and severe (opposed to ). sharp or penetrating in intellect, insight, or perception: an acute observer. extremely sensitive even to slight details or impressions: acute eyesight. sharp at the end; […]

  • Acutilingual

    having a sharply pointed tongue or mouth, as certain bees. Historical Examples acutilingual: with a sharp pointed tongue or mouth structure, as in some bees. Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology John. B. Smith



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