Adjudged



to declare or pronounce formally; decree:
The will was adjudged void.
to award or assign judicially:
The prize was adjudged to him.
to decide by a judicial opinion or sentence:
to adjudge a case.
to sentence or condemn:
He was adjudged to die.
to deem; consider; think:
It was adjudged wise to avoid war.
Contemporary Examples

He seemed miffed, after the game, to be adjudged the best player of the tournament.
Germany Wins, World Cup Justice Is Served Tunku Varadarajan July 12, 2014

Historical Examples

She adjudged the case on its merits, as it would be handled by an administrator of the law—the common law we all must keep.
Some Everyday Folk and Dawn Miles Franklin

Luckily for Sir Marcus, it was adjudged to be off our ‘pitch.’
It Happened in Egypt C. N. Williamson

They decreed that each and every one who gave her shelter should also be adjudged unclean.
Christ Legends Selma Lagerlf

He was adjudged to the scaffold—he smiled when he heard the sentence.
Calderon The Courtier Edward Bulwer-Lytton

This question led to a long argument before Rawson was adjudged to be the better of the two.
Sinister Street, vol. 1 Compton Mackenzie

Yet he lost it, and the gold medal was adjudged to a pupil who was not afterwards heard of.
Self-Help Samuel Smiles

Upon some right, or some pretence, the greatest part of their lands were adjudged to be forfeited.
The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VII. (of 12) Edmund Burke

Has she ever been adjudged so, or committed to any asylum for the insane?
The Cross-Cut Courtney Ryley Cooper

These were adjudged men enough to hazard battle, albeit the enemy were estimated at forty thousand.
The History of the Reformation of Religion in Scotland John Knox

verb (transitive; usually passive)
to pronounce formally; declare: he was adjudged the winner

to determine judicially; judge
to order or pronounce by law; decree: he was adjudged bankrupt
to award (costs, damages, etc)

(archaic) to sentence or condemn
v.

late 14c., “to make a judicial decision,” from Old French ajugier “to judge, pass judgment on,” from Latin adiudicare “grant or award as a judge,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + iudicare “to judge,” which is related to iudicem (see judge (v.)). Sense of “to have an opinion” is from c.1400. Related: Adjudged; adjudging.

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  • Adjudicates

    to pronounce or decree by judicial sentence. to settle or determine (an issue or dispute) judicially. to sit in judgment (usually followed by upon). Contemporary Examples The ICJ adjudicates on disputes between states and its rulings are binding. Serbia and Croatia’s Competing Genocide Claims Adam LeBor March 10, 2014 Historical Examples Not in the judicial […]

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