Admirer



to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval.
to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically):
I admire your audacity.
to feel or express .
Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire:
I would admire to go.
be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire:
He’s admiring of his brother’s farm.
Contemporary Examples

Vardi, an admirer of McLuhan, often tells us that the medium is the message.
Israelis and Palestinians: Getting Down To Business Bernard Avishai June 23, 2013

Within days after the trio went on the lam, an admirer created a Facebook page in her honor.
Fugitive Stripper’s Wild Ride Lynn Waddell August 10, 2011

Every few seconds, an escort or admirer comes by to give Lewis a quick hug or butt-squeeze.
And The Escort of The Year Is… Backstage at The Sex Oscars Scott Bixby March 23, 2014

I have zero objectivity, as a former Clinton speechwriter, and an admirer of both men.
The Unguarded Bill Clinton Ted Widmer October 4, 2009

Cheney was no admirer of Jimmy Carter, who he says had trouble “projecting American power.”
8 Juicy Bits From Dick Cheney’s Memoir David Sessions August 31, 2011

Historical Examples

Could you lend an admirer a dollar and a half to buy a hymn-book with?
Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie Andrew Carnegie

Never would she attempt to divert a glance from her cousin’s admirer.
The Innocent Adventuress Mary Hastings Bradley

You forget that my husband is a traveller, and an admirer of Americans and things American.
At The Sign Of The Eagle Gilbert Parker

“As Miss Dalton’s admirer, I hope rumor adds that,” said she, hastily.
The Daltons, Volume I (of II) Charles James Lever

Fraser, fit to handle his weight in wildcats, as an admirer had once put it, found no trouble in following.
A Texas Ranger William MacLeod Raine

verb (transitive)
to regard with esteem, respect, approval, or pleased surprise
(archaic) to wonder at
n.

c.1600, agent noun from admire (v.). “In common speech, a lover” [Johnson], a sense recorded from 1704.
v.

early 15c. (implied in admired), from Middle French admirer (Old French amirer, 14c.), or directly from Latin admirari “to wonder at” (see admiration). Related: Admiring; admiringly.

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    to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval. to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically): I admire your audacity. to feel or express . Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire: I would admire to go. be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire: He’s admiring of his brother’s […]

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    to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval. to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically): I admire your audacity. to feel or express . Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire: I would admire to go. be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire: He’s admiring of his brother’s […]



  • Admiring

    displaying or feeling : admiring looks. to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval. to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically): I admire your audacity. to feel or express . Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire: I would admire to go. be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to […]

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