Admires



to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval.
to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically):
I admire your audacity.
to feel or express .
Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire:
I would admire to go.
be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire:
He’s admiring of his brother’s farm.
Contemporary Examples

In a new collection of his stories, excerpted here, the great Mark Twain admires the Devil’s “immortal charm and grace.”
Twain’s Conversations with Satan Mark Twain April 25, 2009

At the same time, at least one person who knows and admires the accuser describe her as devastated.
Ray Kelly’s Bad Week: NYPD Chief Sees Son Greg Accused of Rape Michael Daly January 26, 2012

While world leaders were meeting in Deauville, the U.S. secretary of state told French television that she “ admires” Lagarde.
Christine Lagarde: Can a Woman Save the IMF? Tracy McNicoll May 31, 2011

Ask Michel what he admires about President Bush, and he’ll say, “I’ll try not to go on too long…”
Bush’s Ghostwriter Bryan Curtis March 8, 2010

It is a quality Duchovny admires in the lucky few who possess it.
Duchovny’s Commanding Second Act Marty Beckerman October 14, 2009

Historical Examples

Indeed, though she admires the right things, she is essentially the modern woman, whose interest is all in the present and future.
Set in Silver Charles Norris Williamson and Alice Muriel Williamson

admires her great qualities, and glories in the friendship between them.
Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

Query, if one admires an artist or an author, a poet or a musician, is it wise to see him in the flesh?
The Churches of Paris S. Sophia Beale

He will not forget the builder while he admires the architect.
A Dish Of Orts George MacDonald

He admires the profusion of walnuts, chestnuts, wild apples and plums.
The Country of the Neutrals James H. Coyne

verb (transitive)
to regard with esteem, respect, approval, or pleased surprise
(archaic) to wonder at
v.

early 15c. (implied in admired), from Middle French admirer (Old French amirer, 14c.), or directly from Latin admirari “to wonder at” (see admiration). Related: Admiring; admiringly.

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  • Admiring

    displaying or feeling : admiring looks. to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval. to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically): I admire your audacity. to feel or express . Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire: I would admire to go. be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to […]

  • Admissible

    that may be allowed or conceded; allowable: an admissible plan. capable or worthy of being : admissible evidence. Contemporary Examples If somehow the Tsarnaev brothers were detected by a drone, would that be admissible in court? When Drones Come to America, What Happens Then? Miranda Green May 17, 2013 And for Sarkozy, whether his presidential […]



  • Admiringly

    displaying or feeling : admiring looks. Contemporary Examples “You overcame the objection,” says Len admiringly when I tell him about this that night. Confessions of an Obama Volunteer Tom Shone November 3, 2008 Maybe not to true believers like state Sen. Kent Sorenson, who introduced Bachmann admiringly in Indianola as “the real deal.” Michele Bachmann’s […]

  • Admissibility

    that may be allowed or conceded; allowable: an admissible plan. capable or worthy of being : admissible evidence. Historical Examples (c) A third dispute turned upon the admissibility of non-Trinitarians to the privilege of co-operation. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Slice 7 Various Logic is the architect of this region, and for it there […]



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