displaying or feeling :
admiring looks.
to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval.
to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically):
I admire your audacity.
to feel or express .
Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire:
I would admire to go.
be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire:
He’s admiring of his brother’s farm.
Contemporary Examples

“He did not want to come back this season, and I did,” she said, admiring her manicure.
Real Housewives, Real Problems Amy Kaufman November 4, 2009

Is Kate checking out her competition, or admiring another leather jacket?
If Kate Middleton’s Butt Could Speak: It’s Time Royal Princesses Led Visible, Voluble Public Lives Tim Teeman June 3, 2014

I stammered something about admiring his work and the conversation somehow lurched into motion.
Encounters With Thomas Pynchon Nick Romeo October 4, 2011

Their research translated into phenomenal book sales and admiring features.
Welcome to the Anarchy Economy Daniel Gross April 22, 2013

The admiring article did little to refute Hollywood notions of what exorcisms look like.
The Shame of an Exorcist Admitting Violation of Chastity Michelle Goldberg February 1, 2011

Historical Examples

“I should think you would have,” said the other woman, in an admiring tone.
By the Light of the Soul Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

There should be no institution out of the reach of an indignant or admiring humanity.
Alarms and Discursions G. K. Chesterton

Those who were saluted her with admiring looks and generally treated her as a heroine, which caressed her vanity most pleasantly.
The White Terror and The Red Abraham Cahan

Geoff, however, was hardly at the age for admiring scenery much.
Great Uncle Hoot-Toot Mrs. Molesworth

Even in Choate and Phillips you are admiring the phrase and the elocution, and not the men.
Scribner’s Magazine, Volume 26, July 1899 Various

verb (transitive)
to regard with esteem, respect, approval, or pleased surprise
(archaic) to wonder at

early 15c. (implied in admired), from Middle French admirer (Old French amirer, 14c.), or directly from Latin admirari “to wonder at” (see admiration). Related: Admiring; admiringly.


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