Admixture



the act of mixing; state of being mixed.
anything added; any alien element or ingredient:
This is a pure product; there are no admixtures.
a compound containing an admixture.
Historical Examples

Blue, red, and yellow have been termed primary colours; they cannot be formed by the admixture of any other colours.
Principles of Decorative Design Christopher Dresser

I mention them all to show how curious was the admixture of races in our Valley.
In the Valley Harold Frederic

Israel will only be the gainer, even though there be an admixture of impure blood to a certain degree.
The History of a Lie Herman Bernstein

It is throughout Manoelino, and that too with hardly an admixture of Gothic.
Portuguese Architecture Walter Crum Watson

This is the way in which the admixture of foreign blood takes place within the island itself.
The Natural History of the Varieties of Man Robert Gordon Latham

You will say that there is no crowd without an admixture of wicked men.
Erasmus and the Age of Reformation Johan Huizinga

It has a tendency to chalk, but this may be overcome by admixture with other pigments such as zinc oxide and iron oxide.
Paint Technology and Tests Henry A. Gardner

In admixture it may safely be employed, as well as in fresco or enamel.
Field’s Chromatography George Field

The price of olive oil is sufficiently high to lead to its admixture with cheaper oils.
The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom P. L. Simmonds

This is due to the admixture of the wrong or discordant tones.
The Wonder Island Boys: Exploring the Island Roger Thompson Finlay

noun
a less common word for mixture
anything added in mixing; ingredient
n.

c.1600, with -ure, from admix (1530s), a back-formation from admixt (early 15c.), from Latin admixtus “mixed with,” past participle of admiscere “to add to by mingling, mix with,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + miscere “to mix” (see mix). In Middle English admixt was mistaken as a past participle of a (then) non-existent *admix. Earlier in this sense was admixtion (late 14c.).

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  • Admonish

    to caution, advise, or counsel against something. to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner: The teacher admonished him about excessive noise. to urge to a duty; remind: to admonish them about their obligations. Contemporary Examples Betty wastes no time in yanking Sally away from the table to admonish her. A Mother’s […]

  • Admonished

    to caution, advise, or counsel against something. to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner: The teacher admonished him about excessive noise. to urge to a duty; remind: to admonish them about their obligations. Contemporary Examples Browne told the Times, on the second go ’round, that Kelly admonished the film. Ray Kelly’s […]



  • Admonishing

    to caution, advise, or counsel against something. to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner: The teacher admonished him about excessive noise. to urge to a duty; remind: to admonish them about their obligations. Contemporary Examples He made an admonishing speech to Wall Street last week, but it was a day late […]

  • Admonishment

    to caution, advise, or counsel against something. to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner: The teacher admonished him about excessive noise. to urge to a duty; remind: to admonish them about their obligations. Contemporary Examples He spoke to his co-defendant throughout the hearing despite the admonishment of the female judge. London’s […]



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