Admonish



to caution, advise, or counsel against something.
to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner:
The teacher admonished him about excessive noise.
to urge to a duty; remind:
to admonish them about their obligations.
Contemporary Examples

Betty wastes no time in yanking Sally away from the table to admonish her.
A Mother’s Struggles with Her Teen Hannah Seligson September 7, 2010

Beard does admonish the tendency of both academics and popular authors to present speculation as historical truth.
The Classics are Dead! Long Live the Classics! Mary Beard’s New Book Nick Romeo September 19, 2013

When it came to politics, Robbins and Sarandon tended to espouse and admonish rather than try to persuade.
Hollywood’s Liberal Heartbreak Lloyd Grove January 2, 2010

He even remembered to thank the voters and admonish cellphone companies for fleecing his fans.
Mohammed Assaf: From Underdog to Idol Maysoon Zayid June 24, 2013

Historical Examples

The rule to admonish was a wise one, and was adopted to that end.
Woman in Prison Caroline H. Woods

I would address you frankly and admonish you to go no more into such places.
An Outcast F. Colburn Adams

In the next place, I have something about which I wish to admonish yourself.
Letters of John Calvin, Volume II (of 4) Jules Bonnet

Let him admonish, let him teach, let him forbid what is improper!
The Dhammapada Unknown

The philosophers among them continued to dispute, the clergy to admonish, the authors to write.
Historic Ghosts and Ghost Hunters H. Addington Bruce

But does not the past admonish those of us who are Preachers and Teachers?
Broken Bread Thomas Champness

verb (transitive)
to reprove firmly but not harshly
to advise to do or against doing something; warn; caution
v.

mid-14c., amonesten “remind, urge, exhort, warn, give warning,” from Old French amonester (12c.) “urge, encourage, warn,” from Vulgar Latin *admonestare, from Latin admonere “bring to mind, remind, suggest;” also “warn, advise, urge,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + monere “advise, warn” (see monitor (n.)).

The -d- was restored on Latin model. The ending was influenced by words in -ish (e.g. astonish, abolish). Related: Admonished; admonishing.

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  • Admonished

    to caution, advise, or counsel against something. to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner: The teacher admonished him about excessive noise. to urge to a duty; remind: to admonish them about their obligations. Contemporary Examples Browne told the Times, on the second go ’round, that Kelly admonished the film. Ray Kelly’s […]

  • Admonishing

    to caution, advise, or counsel against something. to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner: The teacher admonished him about excessive noise. to urge to a duty; remind: to admonish them about their obligations. Contemporary Examples He made an admonishing speech to Wall Street last week, but it was a day late […]



  • Admonishment

    to caution, advise, or counsel against something. to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner: The teacher admonished him about excessive noise. to urge to a duty; remind: to admonish them about their obligations. Contemporary Examples He spoke to his co-defendant throughout the hearing despite the admonishment of the female judge. London’s […]

  • Admonition

    an act of . counsel, advice, or caution. a gentle reproof. a warning or reproof given by an ecclesiastical authority. Contemporary Examples Kelly’s admonition of the film through an aide‚ years after the fact, doesn’t go down well. Ray Kelly’s Dalliance With The Islamophobic Fringes Ali Gharib July 18, 2013 His admonition last week to […]



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