Adsorption



to gather (a gas, liquid, or dissolved substance) on a surface in a condensed layer:
Charcoal will adsorb gases.
Historical Examples

Further, the electric charge may be reduced also by causing the adsorption of an ion of opposite charge.
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The amount of adsorption depends also upon the exact nature of the sol.
Animal Proteins Hugh Garner Bennett

This latter, by adsorption from the continuous phase, reduces the adsorption of colouring matters by the gelatine particles.
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adsorption is often deliberately increased by a preparatory adsorption.
Animal Proteins Hugh Garner Bennett

These acids also probably cause increase of adsorption of tannin by the hide and therefore assist in giving “good weight.”
Animal Proteins Hugh Garner Bennett

The selective action is known as adsorption and is most noticeable in highly plastic clays.
The Natural History of Clay Alfred B. Searle

Like all electrolytes its presence decreases the adsorption of chromic acid.
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Hence it is necessary for good weight to use a blend of materials, and so supply many grades of liability to adsorption.
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Here again dilution of the sol reduces the adsorption and correspondingly reduces, to some extent, the difficulty.
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In addition to adsorption, there is another phenomenon of colloid chemistry in operation, viz.
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verb
to undergo or cause to undergo a process in which a substance, usually a gas, accumulates on the surface of a solid forming a thin film, often only one molecule thick: to adsorb hydrogen on nickel, oxygen adsorbs on tungsten Compare absorb (sense 8)
v.

1882, transitive (intransitive use attested from 1919), back-formation from adsorption (1882), coined in German from ad- + -sorption, abstracted from absorption. See absorb. Related: Adsorbent; adsorption.

adsorption ad·sorp·tion (ād-sôrp’shən, -zôrp’-)
n.
The property of a solid or liquid to attract and hold to its surface a gas, liquid, solute, or suspension.

adsorb ad·sorb (ād-sôrb’, -zôrb’)
v. ad·sorbed, ad·sorb·ing, ad·sorbs
To take up by adsorption.
adsorption
(ād-sôrp’shən)

The process by which molecules of a substance, such as a gas or a liquid, collect on the surface of another substance, such as a solid. The molecules are attracted to the surface but do not enter the solid’s minute spaces as in absorption. Some drinking water filters consist of carbon cartridges that adsorb contaminants. Compare absorption.

The assimilation of a gas, liquid, or dissolved substance by the surface of a solid.

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  • Adsorptive

    to gather (a gas, liquid, or dissolved substance) on a surface in a condensed layer: Charcoal will adsorb gases. verb to undergo or cause to undergo a process in which a substance, usually a gas, accumulates on the surface of a solid forming a thin film, often only one molecule thick: to adsorb hydrogen on […]

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