Adventitious



associated with something by chance rather than as an integral part; extrinsic.
Botany, Zoology. appearing in an abnormal or unusual position or place, as a root.
Historical Examples

Such acknowledgments are of high value in keeping the issue clear, if not always of all adventitious, yet of all venomous matter.
The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Vol. 6 (of 12) Robert G. Ingersoll

There was no sting in their poverty; no adventitious misery belonging to it.
Deerbrook Harriet Martineau

The changes now detected in response are therefore due to no adventitious circumstance, but to the reagent itself.
Response in the Living and Non-Living Jagadis Chunder Bose

Formation of adventitious flowers and fruits within the ovary.
Vegetable Teratology Maxwell T. Masters

In relating it I have delivered “a round, unvarnished tale,” and have not colored the truth with any adventitious hue of fancy.
The Haunted Homestead E. D. E. N. Southworth

Democritus says that dreams are formed by the illapse of adventitious representations.
Essays and Miscellanies Plutarch

The trees themselves teach him to scorn his master’s adventitious claim to exclusive ownership.
The Centralia Conspiracy Ralph Chaplin

But the book which he has translated possesses, besides these adventitious claims to respect, a supreme intrinsic value.
Vondel’s Lucifer Joost van den Vondel

Hence the recourse to adventitious leverage to push it in, to factitious drill to drive it in, to artificial bribe to lure it in.
The Child and the Curriculum John Dewey

He was more so than Columbus, and rendered the adventitious career of the Genoese possible.
Christopher Columbus and How He Received and Imparted the Spirit of Discovery Justin Winsor

adjective
added or appearing accidentally or unexpectedly
(of a plant or animal part) developing in an abnormal position, as a root that grows from a stem
adj.

“of the nature of an addition from without,” c.1600, from Medieval Latin adventitius “coming from abroad, extraneous,” a corruption of Latin adventicius “foreign, strange, accidental,” from advent- past participle stem of advenire “arrive” (see advent). Related: Adventitiously; adventitiousness.

adventitious ad·ven·ti·tious (ād’věn-tĭsh’əs, -vən-)
adj.

Arising from an external source or occurring in an unusual place or manner; extrinsic.

Occurring accidentally or spontaneously, not caused by heredity.

Adventitial.

ad’ven·ti’tious·ly adv.

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  • Adventitiously

    associated with something by chance rather than as an integral part; extrinsic. Botany, Zoology. appearing in an abnormal or unusual position or place, as a root. Historical Examples He expresses the unalloyed sensibility of an artist in terms of delicious contemporary life and gives us, adventitiously, romance. Since Czanne Clive Bell adjective added or appearing […]



  • Adventitious root

    adventitious root adventitious root (ād’věn-tĭsh’əs) A root growing from a location other than the underground, descending portion of the axis of a plant, as from a stem or leaf.

  • Adventive

    not native and usually not yet well established, as exotic plants or animals. an adventive plant or animal. Historical Examples Denmark (Henriksen, 1939): adventive ; origin mostly Jamaica. The Biotic Associations of Cockroaches Louis M. Roth England (Bunting, 1955): adventive, on bananas from Dominica. The Biotic Associations of Cockroaches Louis M. Roth Hormetica laevigata, Wales […]



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