Advert



to remark or comment; refer (usually followed by to):
He adverted briefly to the news of the day.
to turn the attention (usually followed by to):
The committee adverted to the business at hand.
.
Contemporary Examples

By 15, Shields was saying: “Nothing comes between me and my Calvins” in an advert for Calvin Klein underwear.
In Defense of American Apparel: Why a Hitched-Up Skirt Barely Conceals a Profound Social Confusion Tim Teeman August 7, 2014

“Rage Against the Regime” read a sign taped onto a Carlsberg advert near my house.
Ukraine’s Eurolution Is a PR Godsend for the Struggling E.U. Vijai Maheshwari December 10, 2013

Historical Examples

In the midst of so much human distress, it seems almost like trifling to advert to the poor swallows.
Chambers’s Edinburgh Journal, No. 452 Various

Do you know if Darwin, or any of his Followers, or Antagonists, advert to this?
Letters of Edward FitzGerald in Two Volumes Edward FitzGerald

Let me now advert—not to the whole testimony respecting these voices—but to what was peculiar in that testimony.
The Works of Edgar Allan Poe Edgar Allan Poe

I must advert for a moment to the familiar conception of a maximum or a minimum.
Time and Tide Robert S. (Robert Stawell) Ball

I need not advert to the absurdity of praying to those who could not save themselves from a watery grave.
The Belief in Immortality and the Worship of the Dead, Volume I (of 3) Sir James George Frazer

Of this we shall by and by have to advert more particularly.
A Practical Enquiry into the Philosophy of Education James Gall

Still it may be well for me to advert briefly to some facts in our history as a regiment.
My First Campaign J. W. Grant

To advert now to the subjects of those of December the 12th and 16th.
Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson

noun
(Brit, informal) short for advertisement
verb
(intransitive) foll by to. to draw attention (to); refer (to)
v.

mid-15c., averten “to turn (something) aside,” from Middle French avertir (12c.), from Late Latin advertere (see advertise). The -d- added 16c. on the Latin model. Related: Adverted; adverting.
n.

colloquial shortening of advertisement, attested by 1860.

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  • Advert to

    to remark or comment; refer (usually followed by to): He adverted briefly to the news of the day. to turn the attention (usually followed by to): The committee adverted to the business at hand. noun (Brit, informal) short for advertisement verb (intransitive) foll by to. to draw attention (to); refer (to) v. mid-15c., averten “to […]

  • Adverted

    to remark or comment; refer (usually followed by to): He adverted briefly to the news of the day. to turn the attention (usually followed by to): The committee adverted to the business at hand. Contemporary Examples A major political standoff was only adverted when a bipartisan group of senators known as the Gang of 14 […]



  • Advertence

    the act of being or becoming ; heedfulness. . Historical Examples Here as in all exercise, companionship which removes conscious attention from advertence to the will greatly aids. Health Through Will Power James J. Walsh Lack of advertence always lessens pain and may even nullify it until it becomes exceedingly severe. Health Through Will Power […]

  • Advertency

    the state or quality of being . .



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