Advice



an opinion or recommendation offered as a guide to action, conduct, etc.:
I shall act on your advice.
a communication, especially from a distance, containing information:
Advice from abroad informs us that the government has fallen. Recent diplomatic advices have been ominous.
an official notification, especially one pertaining to a business agreement:
an overdue advice.
Contemporary Examples

Police ignored this advice and instead used brute force to remove Saylor.
Police Brutality’s Hidden Victims: The Disabled Elizabeth Heideman September 7, 2014

But some took this advice with a grain of salt, since Pakistan could be deflecting from its recent battered image.
Day 5: Breaking News on Osama bin Laden’s Death The Daily Beast May 5, 2011

Would it be impertinent of me to offer some advice to you and your readers?
Dear Tina, Try Riding The Subway Toby Young January 12, 2009

Luckily he had the smooth-talking Andy Griffith to give him advice.
George Lindsay Dies: The Best of Goober Pyle (Video) Brittany Jones-Cooper May 6, 2012

In the U.S., however, the twin reactions to his advice have been: disinterest and cynicism.
What the Secret Documents Reveal Dr. Cheryl Benard November 3, 2010

Historical Examples

I used not to hate you; I even had a liking for you; take this advice, then, which you say you are ready to follow.
Mauprat George Sand

The advice was good, but in the present temper of the army it was felt to be impracticable.
Stories from Thucydides H. L. Havell

Why, hedhonestly, dad would just kick me, if I took his advice.
Nothing But the Truth Frederic S. Isham

Against the advice of his men Soto consented to go there with him.
The Trail Book Mary Austin

I took his advice, and borrowed some clothes from Mary, while mine were put to the fire.
The Heroine Eaton Stannard Barrett

noun
recommendation as to appropriate choice of action; counsel
(sometimes pl) formal notification of facts, esp when communicated from a distance
n.

late 13c., auys “opinion,” from Old French avis “opinion, view, judgment, idea” (13c.), from phrase ço m’est à vis “it seems to me,” or from Vulgar Latin *mi est visum “in my view,” ultimately from Latin visum, neuter past participle of videre “to see” (see vision).

The unhistoric -d- was introduced in English 15c., on model of Latin words in ad-. Substitution of -c- for -s- is 18c., to preserve the breath sound and to distinguish from advise. Meaning “opinion given as to action, counsel” is from late 14c.

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