having the form or nature of air; gaseous.
unsubstantial; unreal.
Historical Examples

Warm dry air, especially when in motion, promotes the aeriform transpiration, by favouring evaporation.
The Action of Medicines in the System Frederick William Headland

According to the views we have mentioned, we must ascribe life to a gas, that is, to an aeriform body.
A Strange Story, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton

Personally I prefer the aeriform fluid in front of the curtain.
Nat Goodwin’s Book Nat C. Goodwin

For it must apparently have formed part of an aeriform mass in which they were immersed at an earlier stage of their history.
A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century Agnes M. (Agnes Mary) Clerke

What is the cause of bodies being either solid, liquid, or aeriform?
A Catechism of Familiar Things; Their History, and the Events Which Led to Their Discovery Benziger Brothers

having the form of air; gaseous


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