Affection



fond attachment, devotion, or love:
the affection of a parent for an only child.
Often, affections.

emotion; feeling; sentiment:
over and above our reason and affections.
the emotional realm of love:
a place in his affections.

Pathology. a disease, or the condition of being diseased; abnormal state of body or mind:
a gouty affection.
the act of affecting; act of influencing or acting upon.
the state of being affected.
Philosophy. a contingent, alterable, and accidental state or quality of being.
the affective aspect of a mental process.
bent or disposition of mind.
Obsolete. bias; prejudice.
(defs 1–3).
Contemporary Examples

But at the close of one chapter, she reprints the script of the ad with a seeming note of affection for its “real message.”
10 Juicy Bits from Christine O’Donnell’s ‘Troublemaker’ David Sessions August 11, 2011

And he made his affection clear at the briefing, calling the boss “a president I love and respect.”
Robert Gibbs Resigns: Behind the White House Press Secretary’s Exit Howard Kurtz January 4, 2011

“Once somebody has access to food, to water, to shelter, the next need is affection and sex,” says Turnier.
After the Earthquake: Looming AIDS Crisis in Haiti Lisa Armstrong November 28, 2010

Our affection for him is not solely down to his (stunning) looks alone.
Clooney: A Constant Charmer at the Altar Tim Teeman September 27, 2014

With no touch, affection, and play, the children begin to provide their own stimulation because they need it to survive.
Russia’s Adoption Ban Is Cruel and Vindictive to All Dr. Jane Aronson December 28, 2012

Historical Examples

I come,’ will I say, ‘to vindicate the fair fame of one who once owned your affection.
A Day’s Ride Charles James Lever

I know, better than you possibly can, what reasons I have to trust the strength of his affection.
Philothea Lydia Maria Child

He thanked his King in a voice full of gratitude and affection.
Robin Hood Paul Creswick

“He is a good son to me,” said Mrs. Rushton, with a glance of affection.
Brave and Bold Horatio Alger

You mustn’t allow any—any affection for me to—to influence you in this matter.’
Niece Catherine Mary Hampden

noun
a feeling of fondness or tenderness for a person or thing; attachment
(often pl) emotion, feeling, or sentiment: to play on a person’s affections
(pathol) any disease or pathological condition
(psychol) any form of mental functioning that involves emotion See also affect1 (sense 2)
the act of affecting or the state of being affected
(archaic) inclination or disposition
n.

early 13c., “an emotion of the mind, passion, lust as opposed to reason,” from Old French afection (12c.) “emotion, inclination, disposition; love, attraction, enthusiasm,” from Latin affectionem (nominative affectio) “a relation, disposition; a temporary state; a frame, constitution,” noun of state from past participle stem of afficere “to do something to, act on” (see affect (n.)). Sense developed from “disposition” to “good disposition toward” (late 14c.). Related: Affections.

affection af·fec·tion (ə-fěk’shən)
n.

A tender feeling toward another; fondness.

A bodily condition; disease.

feeling or emotion. Mention is made of “vile affections” (Rom. 1:26) and “inordinate affection” (Col. 3:5). Christians are exhorted to set their affections on things above (Col. 3:2). There is a distinction between natural and spiritual or gracious affections (Ezek. 33:32).

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  • Affectionate

    showing, indicating, or characterized by affection or love; fondly tender: an affectionate embrace. having great affection or love; warmly attached; loving: your affectionate brother. Obsolete. strongly disposed or inclined. passionate; headstrong. biased; partisan. Contemporary Examples While we did not ‘know’ each other in a Biblical sense, it was nevertheless inappropriately romantic and affectionate. Sex Scandal […]



  • Affectionately

    showing, indicating, or characterized by affection or love; fondly tender: an affectionate embrace. having great affection or love; warmly attached; loving: your affectionate brother. Obsolete. strongly disposed or inclined. passionate; headstrong. biased; partisan. Contemporary Examples The Volcano is affectionately known as the “Mercedes Benz” of toking up. How Rich People Smoke Pot Paul Schrodt February […]

  • Affectionless

    fond attachment, devotion, or love: the affection of a parent for an only child. Often, affections. emotion; feeling; sentiment: over and above our reason and affections. the emotional realm of love: a place in his affections. Pathology. a disease, or the condition of being diseased; abnormal state of body or mind: a gouty affection. the […]



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