Affiance



to pledge by promise of marriage; betroth.
a pledging of faith, as a marriage contract.
trust; confidence; reliance.
Historical Examples

Jealousy and distrust are the bane of friendship, whose essence is esteem and affiance.
Letters on the Improvement of the Mind Hester Chapone

Thus he pledged his faith, and the Duke accepted his affiance.
French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France Marie de France

He is a traitor to affiance and abuse to employment, and a rule of villainy in a plot of mischief.
Character Writings of the 17th Century Various

The young Duke of Hamilton was, however, the successful one; and the pledge of affiance passed mutually.
The Memorials of the Hamlet of Knightsbridge Henry George Davis

Their notion of the real meaning of the period of affiance commended itself entirely to his lofty sentiments.
Kophetua the Thirteenth Julian Corbett

William made use of Haralds compulsory sojourn to make him swear allegiance to him, and affiance him to his daughter.
The Sagas of Olaf Tryggvason and of Harald The Tyrant (Harald Haardraade) Snorri Sturluson

In the words of the old church service, “her soul must ever have affiance in God.”
Household Papers and Stories Harriet Beecher Stowe

It is not well done for a king to affiance himself to one woman when he already has another for his wife.
Historical Tales, Vol. 9 (of 15) Charles Morris

That attachment and affiance, which ought to subsist between the dependant and his protector, are destroyed.
Letters on the Improvement of the Mind Hester Chapone

For nothing that man can give would I have you doubt my faith and affiance.
French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France Marie de France

verb
(transitive) to bind (a person or oneself) in a promise of marriage; betroth
noun
(archaic) a solemn pledge, esp a marriage contract
v.

1520s, “to promise,” from Old French afiancier “to pledge, promise, give one’s word,” from afiance (n.) “confidence, trust,” from afier “to trust,” from Late Latin affidare, from ad- “to” (see ad-) + fidare “to trust,” from fidus (see affidavit). From mid-16c. especially “to promise in marriage.” Related: Affianced; affiancing.

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    betrothed; engaged. to pledge by promise of marriage; betroth. a pledging of faith, as a marriage contract. trust; confidence; reliance. Historical Examples Will it please you to remember that M. d’Ombreval is my affianced husband? The Trampling of the Lilies Rafael Sabatini Let me explain, then, that we have been affianced from our childhood. Down […]

  • Affiant

    a person who makes an affidavit. Historical Examples The signature should correspond exactly with the name of the affiant stated at the beginning. Copyright: Its History and Its Law Richard Rogers Bowker Where a corporation or firm is the claimant, the affiant should swear as agent. Copyright: Its History and Its Law Richard Rogers Bowker […]



  • Affiche

    a notice posted in a public place; poster. Historical Examples It may be noted in passing that, like Edgar of that name, Mr. W. Wilson has also attempted an affiche. Picture Posters Charles Hiatt And for a young girl to be affiche with Almington her first season is nothing short of tarnishing, Felicia went on, […]

  • Afficionado

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