Affix



to fasten, join, or attach (usually followed by to):
to affix stamps to a letter.
to put or add on; append:
to affix a signature to a contract.
to impress (a seal or stamp).
to attach (blame, reproach, ridicule, etc.).
something that is joined or attached.
Grammar. a bound inflectional or derivational element, as a prefix, infix, or suffix, added to a base or stem to form a fresh stem or a word, as -ed added to want to form wanted, or im- added to possible to form impossible.
Contemporary Examples

But what we don’t get from Rubin or Harris is why exactly Hagel refused to affix his name to the letter.
AJC Leaves Out Context Of Hagel Letters Ali Gharib December 19, 2012

And he did, in fact, affix his Hancock to the tax increases in question.
2012 GOP Presidential Candidates Raised Taxes Andrew Romano April 18, 2011

Historical Examples

They send to demand musters of the articles imported, and affix their own price for such as they wish to purchase.
The Mission to Siam, and Hu the Capital of Cochin China, in the Years 1821-2 George Finlayson

To neither did he affix his name, but the latter was said to be by “a Gentleman of Oxford.”
The Poetical Works of William Collins William Collins

If the Council insisted on passing it, he might affix his signature but advise the King to disallow it.
Give Me Liberty Thomas J. Wertenbaker

affix them to the bench by nails or screws, preferably the latter.
Electricity for Boys J. S. Zerbe

Under each word the force of the prefix is usually given, though not the affix.
Chambers’s Twentieth Century Dictionary (part 1 of 4: A-D) Various

On the right is the pear-tree, to which later on we have to affix a captive pear.
Punch, or the London Charivari, June 10, 1914 Various

The Ancient Charges, while they assert that every Mason should belong to a lodge, affix no penalty for disobedience.
The Principles of Masonic Law Albert G. Mackey

The Father of his Country did not affix his revered name to so palpable an absurdity.
Key-Notes of American Liberty Various

verb (transitive; usually foll by to or on) (əˈfɪks)
to attach, fasten, join, or stick: to affix a poster to the wall
to add or append: to affix a signature to a document
to attach or attribute (guilt, blame, etc)
noun (ˈæfɪks)
a linguistic element added to a word or root to produce a derived or inflected form: -ment in establishment is a derivational affix; -s in drowns is an inflectional affix See also prefix, suffix, infix
something fastened or attached; appendage
v.

1530s, from Medieval Latin affixare, frequentative of Latin affigere (past participle affixus) “fasten to, attach,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + figere “fasten” (see fix (v.)).

First used by Scottish writers and perhaps from Middle French affixer, a temporarily re-Latinized spelling of Old French afichier (Modern French afficher). Related: Affixed; affixing.
n.

1610s, from affix (v.).

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  • Affixation

    . Grammar. the process of inflection or derivation that consists of adding an . Historical Examples We have reserved the very curious type of affixation known as “infixing” for separate illustration. Language Edward Sapir

  • Affixed

    to fasten, join, or attach (usually followed by to): to affix stamps to a letter. to put or add on; append: to affix a signature to a contract. to impress (a seal or stamp). to attach (blame, reproach, ridicule, etc.). something that is joined or attached. Grammar. a bound inflectional or derivational element, as a […]



  • Affixes

    to fasten, join, or attach (usually followed by to): to affix stamps to a letter. to put or add on; append: to affix a signature to a contract. to impress (a seal or stamp). to attach (blame, reproach, ridicule, etc.). something that is joined or attached. Grammar. a bound inflectional or derivational element, as a […]

  • Affixing

    to fasten, join, or attach (usually followed by to): to affix stamps to a letter. to put or add on; append: to affix a signature to a contract. to impress (a seal or stamp). to attach (blame, reproach, ridicule, etc.). something that is joined or attached. Grammar. a bound inflectional or derivational element, as a […]



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