Affixing



to fasten, join, or attach (usually followed by to):
to affix stamps to a letter.
to put or add on; append:
to affix a signature to a contract.
to impress (a seal or stamp).
to attach (blame, reproach, ridicule, etc.).
something that is joined or attached.
Grammar. a bound inflectional or derivational element, as a prefix, infix, or suffix, added to a base or stem to form a fresh stem or a word, as -ed added to want to form wanted, or im- added to possible to form impossible.
Contemporary Examples

After affixing the Crimson Trace laser sight, like the one Perry uses, the gun required a larger holster.
Ranger Rick and the Coyote Carol Flake Chapman September 9, 2011

Historical Examples

The young man stood all day upon his narrow platform, affixing rings or holding forth the basket.
The Open Boat and Other Stories Stephen Crane

On August 4th he has the gratification of affixing his name to it.
Diaries of Sir Moses and Lady Montefiore, Volume I Sir Moses Montefiore

This is the inventory of the goods, Herr Graf, which you will please assign over to me, by affixing your signature.
The Dodd Family Abroad, Vol. I.(of II) Charles James Lever

This stamp was employed in affixing his signature to the remission to the Hamiltons.
The Mystery of Mary Stuart Andrew Lang

Persons agreeing to buy a ship’s cargo appoint a disinterested person to allot a share to each by affixing their respective names.
The Sailor’s Word-Book William Henry Smyth

Did you consider that reply as affixing the ownership of the horse to himself?
Geoffery Gambado William Henry Bunbury

As he spoke he drew an arrow from his quiver, and, affixing the notch to the bow-string, carried the weapon in his left hand.
The Crew of the Water Wagtail R.M. Ballantyne

To the readers of this poem an apology is needed for affixing thereto a praem.
Betelguese Jean Louis de Esque

Of the three types of affixing—the use of prefixes, suffixes, and infixes—suffixing is much the commonest.
Language Edward Sapir

verb (transitive; usually foll by to or on) (əˈfɪks)
to attach, fasten, join, or stick: to affix a poster to the wall
to add or append: to affix a signature to a document
to attach or attribute (guilt, blame, etc)
noun (ˈæfɪks)
a linguistic element added to a word or root to produce a derived or inflected form: -ment in establishment is a derivational affix; -s in drowns is an inflectional affix See also prefix, suffix, infix
something fastened or attached; appendage
v.

1530s, from Medieval Latin affixare, frequentative of Latin affigere (past participle affixus) “fasten to, attach,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + figere “fasten” (see fix (v.)).

First used by Scottish writers and perhaps from Middle French affixer, a temporarily re-Latinized spelling of Old French afichier (Modern French afficher). Related: Affixed; affixing.
n.

1610s, from affix (v.).

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  • Affixment

    to fasten, join, or attach (usually followed by to): to affix stamps to a letter. to put or add on; append: to affix a signature to a contract. to impress (a seal or stamp). to attach (blame, reproach, ridicule, etc.). something that is joined or attached. Grammar. a bound inflectional or derivational element, as a […]

  • Affixture

    the act of affixing; attachment.



  • Afflated

    having inspiration; inspired.

  • Afflatus

    inspiration; an impelling mental force acting from within. divine communication of knowledge. Historical Examples And that afflatus was no such great matter, either: afflatuses should not promise more than they mean to perform. The Works of Lucian of Samosata, v. 4 Lucian of Samosata Metre and rhyme, I grant you—long and short—but show me the […]



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