Affliction



a state of pain, distress, or grief; misery:
They sympathized with us in our affliction.
a cause of mental or bodily pain, as sickness, loss, calamity, or persecution.
Contemporary Examples

I thought, if he had an affliction over half his face, maybe he was missing part of his mouth.
Boardwalk Empire’s Scene-Stealer Jace Lacob October 23, 2011

But the majority of the time is spent dissembling the system that has enabled the addict to finance and feed their affliction.
The Rehab Show That Works Natasha Vargas-Cooper July 20, 2010

Typically, Borges embraced his affliction “as a gift,” which encouraged recollection.
The Best of Brit Lit Peter Stothard January 24, 2011

It was simply written: a man with an affliction on half his face who wears a tin mask to cover it.
Boardwalk Empire’s Scene-Stealer Jace Lacob October 23, 2011

See Jacob Bernstein’s “10 Ways to Win an Oscar” for an expanded list of how affliction can lead to a lock on Oscar gold.
Mumbling Wins Oscars! Zachary Pincus-Roth March 2, 2010

Historical Examples

He looked, Rainey thought, like a blind Berserker, restrained only by his affliction.
A Man to His Mate J. Allan Dunn

She could not bear to part with Flora, who had been both nurse and comforter to her in her affliction.
Down The River Oliver Optic

We are companions in affliction since my law case will not be tried.
The Mesmerist’s Victim Alexandre Dumas

To add to the affliction of La Salle, the Belle, the only vessel remaining to him, was wrecked and utterly lost.
The Adventures of the Chevalier De La Salle and His Companions, in Their Explorations of the Prairies, Forests, Lakes, and Rivers, of the New World, and Their Interviews with the Savage Tribes, Two Hundred Years Ago John S. C. Abbott

In the days of ease thereafter, in Valencia when we dwell, The tale of our affliction, we shall have strength to tell.
The Lay of the Cid R. Selden Rose

noun
a condition of great distress, pain, or suffering
something responsible for physical or mental suffering, such as a disease, grief, etc
n.

c.1300, from Old French afliction (11c.), from Latin afflictionem (nominative afflictio), noun of action from past participle stem of affligere (see afflict).

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