Affronted



a personally offensive act or word; deliberate act or display of disrespect; intentional slight; insult:
an affront to the king.
an offense to one’s dignity or self-respect.
to offend by an open manifestation of disrespect or insolence:
His speech affronted all of us.
to make ashamed or confused; embarrass.
Archaic. to front; face; look on.
Obsolete. to meet or encounter face to face; confront.
Contemporary Examples

Soldera comes across like that uncle who, once affronted, crosses you off forever.
Brunello’s King Lear: Gianfranco Soldera Reflects on the Attack on His Wine Alice Feiring December 7, 2013

Historical Examples

She did not know whether she was affronted, or hurt, or merely startled.
The Captain’s Toll-Gate Frank R. Stockton

Rose caught it, and said, “Well, am I to be affronted any more?”
White Lies Charles Reade

You should ha’ thought twice before you affronted to extremes a man who had nothing to lose.
The Mayor of Casterbridge Thomas Hardy

The woman smiled, not at all affronted by the lack of courtesy shown her.
Elizabeth Hobart at Exeter Hall Jean K. Baird

We are by nature kind and generous, vengeful only when insulted, cruel only when affronted.
The Supernatural in Modern English Fiction Dorothy Scarborough

This affronted Mr. Betterton, who threw down the money, and they entered.
The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor Various

Then they are amazed and affronted; and wonder “since when?”
The Letters Of Mark Twain, Volume 4, 1886-1900 Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)

The driver was affronted, but the farmer pacified him by an appeal to his fear.
The Manxman Hall Caine

Tut, tut, to think now that so great a friend should be affronted at such a trifle.
The Life of a Celebrated Buccaneer Richard Clynton

noun
a deliberate insult
verb (transitive)
to insult, esp openly
to offend the pride or dignity of
(obsolete) to confront defiantly
v.

early 14c., from Old French afronter “to face, confront, to slap in the face” (13c.), from Late Latin affrontare “to strike against,” from Latin ad frontem “to the face,” from frons (genitive frontis) “forehead” (see front (n.)). Related: Affronted; affronting.
n.

1590s, from affront (v.).

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  • Affronting

    a personally offensive act or word; deliberate act or display of disrespect; intentional slight; insult: an affront to the king. an offense to one’s dignity or self-respect. to offend by an open manifestation of disrespect or insolence: His speech affronted all of us. to make ashamed or confused; embarrass. Archaic. to front; face; look on. […]

  • Affrontive

    insulting; offensive. Historical Examples As to the Scotch, their barbarisms that are to be found even in print, are affrontive to the descendants of Englishmen. A Journal of a Young Man of Massachusetts, 2nd ed. Benjamin Waterhouse



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