Aggregable



formed by the conjunction or collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; total; combined:
the aggregate amount of indebtedness.
Botany.

(of a flower) formed of florets collected in a dense cluster but not cohering, as the daisy.
(of a fruit) composed of a cluster of carpels belonging to the same flower, as the raspberry.

Geology. (of a rock) consisting of a mixture of minerals separable by mechanical means.
a sum, mass, or assemblage of particulars; a total or gross amount:
the aggregate of all past experience.
a cluster of soil granules not larger than a small crumb.
any of various loose, particulate materials, as sand, gravel, or pebbles, added to a cementing agent to make concrete, plaster, etc.
Mathematics, (def 92).
to bring together; collect into one sum, mass, or body.
to amount to (the number of):
The guns captured will aggregate five or six hundred.
to combine and form a collection or mass.
in the aggregate, taken or considered as a whole:
In the aggregate, our losses have been relatively small.
Historical Examples

The card is apparently “aggregable” with something or other for the purposes of duty.
Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Dec. 12, 1917 Various

adjective (ˈæɡrɪɡɪt; -ˌɡeɪt)
formed of separate units collected into a whole; collective; corporate
(of fruits and flowers) composed of a dense cluster of carpels or florets
noun (ˈæɡrɪɡɪt; -ˌɡeɪt)
a sum or assemblage of many separate units; sum total
(geology) a rock, such as granite, consisting of a mixture of minerals
the sand and stone mixed with cement and water to make concrete
a group of closely related biotypes produced by apomixis, such as brambles, which are the Rubus fruticosus aggregate
in the aggregate, taken as a whole
verb (ˈæɡrɪˌɡeɪt)
to combine or be combined into a body, etc
(transitive) to amount to (a number)
adj.

c.1400, from Latin aggregatus “associated,” literally “united in a flock,” past participle of aggregare “add to (a flock), lead to a flock, bring together (in a flock),” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + gregare “herd” (see gregarious).
v.

c.1400, from Latin aggregatum, neuter past participle of aggregare (see aggregate (adj.)). Related: Aggregated; aggregating.
n.

“number of persons, things, etc., regarded as a unit,” early 15c., from noun use of Latin adjective aggregatum, neuter of aggregatus (see aggregate (adj.)).

aggregate ag·gre·gate (āg’rĭ-gĭt)
adj.
Crowded or massed into a dense cluster. n.
A total considered with reference to its constituent parts; a gross amount in a mass or cluster. v. ag·gre·gat·ed, ag·gre·gat·ing, ag·gre·gates (-gāt’)
To gather into a mass, sum, or whole.

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    formed by the conjunction or collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; total; combined: the aggregate amount of indebtedness. Botany. (of a flower) formed of florets collected in a dense cluster but not cohering, as the daisy. (of a fruit) composed of a cluster of carpels belonging to the same flower, as the […]

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