Agonize



to suffer extreme pain or anguish; be in .
to put forth great effort of any kind.
to distress with extreme pain; torture.
Contemporary Examples

Parents stood up to agonize about their responsibility, as cosigners, for the loans of their now unemployed offspring.
NYU Professor: Are Student Loans Immoral? Andrew Ross September 26, 2012

The key is how much we can brood, and what is meant by brooding—is it to daydream, or is it to agonize over every detail?
‘True Detective,’ Obsessive-Compulsive Noir, and ‘Twin Peaks’ Jimmy So March 13, 2014

The revenge factor would have been an added bonus, but really, what I wanted was for people to agonize over why I’d done it.
I Was Adam Lanza, Part 3 David Frum December 22, 2012

Historical Examples

The great souls come and go and agonize and cry in the wilderness, and the little souls determine what shall be.
Under the Law Edwina Stanton Babcock

May we know a little better what it is to agonize in prayer.
The Assembly of God C. (Charles) H. (Henry) Mackintosh

Lock up the human wild beasts who agonize for liberty, and you will find that few jails will hold them.
The Arena Various

And this seething life, the turmoil and the noises of the city, agonize me.
Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist Alexander Berkman

Yet, dying, I agonize to live, and fear to drink the last drop of that bitter cup.
Library of the World’s Best Literature, Ancient and Modern Volume 11 Various

Too far gone to agonize in prayer, I could only quietly, almost mutely, just tell him how the poor child had no clothes.
How I Know God Answers Prayer Rosalind Goforth

The plan operated mainly to agonize many children permanently against arising to speak their thought to fellow-creatures.
Whilomville Stories Stephen Crane

verb
to suffer or cause to suffer agony
(intransitive) to make a desperate effort; struggle; strive
v.

1580s, “to torture,” from Middle French agoniser or directly from Medieval Latin agonizare, from Greek agonizesthai “to contend in the struggle” (see agony). Intransitive sense of “to suffer physical pain” is recorded from 1660s. That of “to worry intensely” is from 1853. Related: Agonized; agonizing.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Agonise

    to suffer extreme pain or anguish; be in . to put forth great effort of any kind. to distress with extreme pain; torture. Historical Examples Othello must not agonise for a cloak, but ‘the little orphan Alice Fell’ has nothing else to agonise for. Oxford Lectures on Poetry Andrew Cecil Bradley If we agonise that […]

  • Agonising

    to suffer extreme pain or anguish; be in . to put forth great effort of any kind. to distress with extreme pain; torture. Contemporary Examples The sign says that it produced “extreme emaciation and a slow, agonising death.” My Visit To Hell Christopher Buckley January 29, 2009 Historical Examples To the castaways every hour of […]



  • Agonist

    a person engaged in a contest, conflict, struggle, etc., especially the protagonist in a literary work. a person who is torn by inner conflict. Physiology. a contracting muscle whose action is opposed by another muscle. Compare (def 3). Pharmacology. a chemical substance capable of activating a receptor to induce a full or partial pharmacological response. […]

  • Agonistic

    combative; striving to overcome in argument. straining for effect: agonistic humor. of or relating to ancient Greek athletic contests. Ethology. pertaining to the range of activities associated with aggressive encounters between members of the same species, including threat, attack, appeasement, or retreat. Historical Examples Moreover, most of the burrows were only a few feet apart […]



Disclaimer: Agonize definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.