(often lowercase) a verse or line of poetry of twelve syllables.
(often lowercase) of or relating to such a verse or line.
of or relating to , Egypt.
Contemporary Examples

I’d love to hear that voice of yours revving on some Alexandrine verse.
Kathleen Turner’s New Broadway High Kevin Sessums April 16, 2011

Historical Examples

This poetry is in that irregular Alexandrine measure, which, as has been observed, arose out of the Latin pentameter.
Introduction to the Literature of Europe in the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Centuries, Vol. 1 Henry Hallam

This Alexandrine is not common, and is probably a mere oversight.
A History of English Literature George Saintsbury

“Yes, everything is as perfect as one could desire,” said Alexandrine.
The Fatal Glove Clara Augusta Jones Trask

But at this time Trypho, the Alexandrine architect, was there.
Ten Books on Architecture Vitruvius

This led to the Alexandrine war, in the course of which this elder Ptolemy perished.
Chaucer’s Works, Volume 3 (of 7) Geoffrey Chaucer

This beautiful maiden was Alexandrine Flicie Villeminot, an orphan.
Ole Bull Sara C. Bull

Its author is believed to have been an Alexandrine Jew, but his age cannot be determined.
Companion to the Bible E. P. Barrows

Our Iambic in its sixth form, is commonly called the Alexandrine measure.
The Comic English Grammar Percival Leigh

As for the pressure fountain, this had reached perfection as long ago as the Alexandrine epoch.
Scientific American, September 29, 1883 Supplement. No. 404 Various

a line of verse having six iambic feet, usually with a caesura after the third foot
of, characterized by, or written in Alexandrines

in reference to a type of verse line, 1580s (adj.); 1660s (n.), said to be from Old French Roman d’Alexandre, name of a poem about Alexander the Great that was popular in the Middle Ages, which used a 12-syllable line of 6 feet (the French heroic verse); it was used in English to vary the heroic verse of 5 feet. The name also sometimes is said to be from Alexandre de Paris, 13c. French poet, who used such a line (and who also wrote one of the popular Alexander the Great poems).


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