Alias



a false name used to conceal one’s identity; an assumed name:
The police files indicate that “Smith” is an alias for Simpson.
at another time; in another place; in other circumstances; otherwise. “Simpson alias Smith” means that Simpson in other circumstances has called himself Smith.
otherwise called; alias.
Contemporary Examples

alias would make a star out of former Felicity guest star Garner and become an international hit.
Keri Russell On ‘The Americans,’ Sleeper Agents, Motherhood & More Jace Lacob January 28, 2013

Sonny Moore, 24, has been producing and performing electronic music under the alias Skrillex since 2008.
Meet Skrillex, the Divisive, Grammy-Nominated DJ Who’s Changing Dance Music Marlow Stern February 8, 2012

The Daily Beast has learned that Murphy, as do many stars, used an alias—Lola Manilow—when booking cars and hotels and travel.
Brittany’s ‘Spaced-Out’ World Gerald Posner December 20, 2009

Molina has since admitted to going by the alias Tito during the civil war but denied his troops were involved in any atrocities.
Guatemala’s Trial of the Century Mac Margolis May 5, 2013

He orders a Smith Wesson .38 snub-​nosed revolver through the mail, using the same alias.
The Man Oswald First Tried to Kill Before JFK Bill Minutaglio, Steven L. Davis October 2, 2013

Historical Examples

In that book the Israelites always conquered in the end, although the Philistines, alias Fung, sat at their gates.
Queen Sheba’s Ring H. Rider Haggard

Pete was disgusted with his brother Homer, alias Bill Moore.
Oh, You Tex! William Macleod Raine

That, as he argues in detail, is merely begging the question, by introducing the principle of causation under an alias.
The English Utilitarians, Volume II (of 3) Leslie Stephen

Thus Griffith, alias Thomas, became her sunbeam, and Paul her cloud.
The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 104, June, 1866 Various

Did this suggest to de Bourgogne the alias “ le Barbe,” or was that only a Lige nickname?
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 17, Slice 5 Various

adverb
at another time or place known as or named: Dylan, alias Zimmerman
noun (pl) -ases
an assumed name
adv.

mid-15c., “otherwise called,” from Latin alias “at another time, in another way,” from alius “(an)other,” from PIE *al- “beyond” (cf. Sanskrit anya “other, different,” Avestan anya-, Armenian ail, Greek allos “another,” Gothic aljis “other,” Old English elles “otherwise, else,” Modern English else).
n.

“assumed name,” c.1600, from alias (adv.).

ALgorIthmic ASsembly language

1. A name, usually short and easy to remember and type, that is translated into another name or string, usually long and difficult to remember or type. Most command interpreters (e.g. Unix’s csh) allow the user to define aliases for commands, e.g. “alias l ls -al”. These are loaded into memory when the interpreter starts and are expanded without needing to refer to any file.
2. One of several alternative hostnames with the same Internet address. E.g. in the Unix hosts database (/etc/hosts or NIS map) the first field on a line is the Internet address, the next is the official hostname (the “canonical name” or “CNAME”), and any others are aliases.
Hostname aliases often indicate that the host with that alias provides a particular network service such as archie, finger, FTP, or World-Wide Web. The assignment of services to computers can then be changed simply by moving an alias (e.g. www.doc.ic.ac.uk) from one Internet address to another, without the clients needing to be aware of the change.
3. The name used by Apple computer, Inc. for symbolic links when they added them to the System 7 operating system in 1991.
(1997-10-22)
4. Two names (identifiers), usually of local or global variables, that refer to the same resource (memory location) are said to be aliased. Although names introduced in programming languages are typically mapped to different memory locations, aliasing can be introduced by the use of address arithmetic and pointers or language-specific features, like C++ references.
Statically deciding (e.g. via a program analysis executed by a sophisticated compiler) which locations of a program will be aliased at run time is an undecidable problem.
[G. Ramalingam: “The Undecidability of Aliasing”, ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems (TOPLAS), Volume 16, Issue 5, September 1994, Pages: 1467 – 1471, ISSN:0164-0925.]
(2004-09-12)

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  • Alias dictus

    otherwise called; alias.

  • Aliases

    a false name used to conceal one’s identity; an assumed name: The police files indicate that “Smith” is an alias for Simpson. at another time; in another place; in other circumstances; otherwise. “Simpson alias Smith” means that Simpson in other circumstances has called himself Smith. Contemporary Examples Hubbard, who went under the aliases Larry David […]



  • Aliasing

    a jagged, stairstep effect on curved or diagonal lines that are reproduced in low resolution, as on a computer printout or display. noun (radio, television) the error in a vision or sound signal arising from limitations in the system that generates or processes the signal aliasing (ā’lē-ə-sĭng) Jagged distortions in curves and diagonal lines in […]

  • Aliasing bug

    aliasing bug stale pointer bug



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