Alienate



to make indifferent or hostile:
By refusing to get a job, he has alienated his entire family.
to cause to be withdrawn or isolated from the objective world:
Bullying alienates already shy students from their classmates.
to turn away; transfer or divert:
to alienate funds from their intended purpose.
Law. to transfer or convey, as title, property, or other right, to another:
to alienate lands.
Contemporary Examples

Howard Kurtz on the long paper trail that could alienate moderate swing-state voters just getting to know Paul Ryan.
Is Paul Ryan a Ticking Time Bomb as Mitt Romney’s Running Mate? Howard Kurtz August 13, 2012

The outgoing White House economic adviser can alienate a room in record time.
Larry Summers’ Brutal Brilliance Niall Ferguson September 21, 2010

To compound this problem, merchants can alienate their existing customers by offering coupons.
Why Groupon and Living Social Are Doomed Matthew Zeitlin November 29, 2012

They cannot afford to alienate the fastest-growing communities of color in the USA.
GOP Needs More Northeast Republicans to Save the Party John Avlon January 29, 2013

Similarly, his opposition to abortion—even in cases of rape—may alienate some voters, especially in a general election.
Rick Santorum’s Trial by Media Focused on Birth Control Howard Kurtz February 19, 2012

Historical Examples

This tends to alienate public sympathy, and to forfeit the aid which sympathy insures.
Essentials of Economic Theory John Bates Clark

Had anything occurred that was likely to alienate her from her family?
Howards End E. M. Forster

These are rights which no human being can alienate to the state.
Chapters on Jewish Literature Israel Abrahams

Great efforts were then made to alienate Henry from his faithful minister.
Henry IV, Makers of History John S. C. Abbott

Nothing but his free and formal promise, obtained in return for favours received, can alienate that right.
The River War Winston S. Churchill

verb (transitive)
to cause (a friend, sympathizer, etc) to become indifferent, unfriendly, or hostile; estrange
to turn away; divert: to alienate the affections of a person
(law) to transfer the ownership of (property, title, etc) to another person
v.

1540s, “make estranged” (in feelings or affections), from Latin alienatus, past participle of alienare “to make another’s, estrange,” from alienus “of or belonging to another person or place,” from alius “(an)other” (see alias (adv.)). Related: Alienated; alienating.

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  • Alienated

    to make indifferent or hostile: By refusing to get a job, he has alienated his entire family. to cause to be withdrawn or isolated from the objective world: Bullying alienates already shy students from their classmates. to turn away; transfer or divert: to alienate funds from their intended purpose. Law. to transfer or convey, as […]

  • Alienation of affections

    the estrangement by a third person of one spouse from the other.



  • Alienation

    the act of , or of causing someone to become indifferent or hostile: The advocacy group fights against prejudice and social alienation of immigrants. the state of being , withdrawn, or isolated from the objective world, as through indifference or disaffection: the group’s alienation from mainstream society. the act of turning away, transferring, or diverting: […]

  • Alienative

    the act of , or of causing someone to become indifferent or hostile: The advocacy group fights against prejudice and social alienation of immigrants. the state of being , withdrawn, or isolated from the objective world, as through indifference or disaffection: the group’s alienation from mainstream society. the act of turning away, transferring, or diverting: […]



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