Allude



to refer casually or indirectly; make an (usually followed by to):
He often alluded to his poverty.
to contain a casual or indirect reference (usually followed by to):
The letter alludes to something now forgotten.
Contemporary Examples

Chang used silicon and metal because she wanted her device to be touch-friendly, yet allude to jewelry.
The Duet: The iPod of Vibrators? Eric V. Copage February 19, 2012

While doing so, she gets to allude to her political platform in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.
Inside Palin’s Reality Show Shushannah Walshe November 9, 2010

Some also speculate that the name could allude to Francis Xavier, the co-founder of the Society of Jesuis—aka the Jesuits.
Can We Call Him Frank? New Pope Picks New Name, Francis Andrew Romano March 12, 2013

I may not do more than allude to his death, fit ending of his life.
The Real Memorial Day: Oliver Wendell Holmes’s Salute To A Momentous American Anniversary Malcolm Jones May 25, 2014

Last season was definitely challenging, because we were not allowed to mention them or allude to a mole of any kind.
The Leaner, Meaner Season 2 of ‘Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.’ Jason Lynch September 21, 2014

Historical Examples

I allude to the following, which stands in my first folio, Act IV.
Notes and Queries, Number 207, October 15, 1853 Various

When I use the word simplicity, I allude, of course, to everyday cooking.
The Cook’s Decameron: A Study in Taste: Mrs. W. G. Waters

In two instances only does Shakespeare allude to a particular species of hawk.
The Ornithology of Shakespeare James Edmund Harting

“I don’t know to what you allude, Joe,” said Mr. Lavender severely.
The Burning Spear John Galsworthy

It may to some minds be a desideratum, to allude to the anterior probability that God should come in the flesh.
The Complete Prose Works of Martin Farquhar Tupper Martin Farquhar Tupper

verb (intransitive) foll by to
to refer indirectly, briefly, or implicitly
(loosely) to mention
v.

1530s, “mock,” from Middle French alluder or directly from Latin alludere “to play, sport, joke, jest,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + ludere “to play” (see ludicrous). Meaning “make an indirect reference, point in passing” is from 1570s. Related: Alluded; alluding.

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  • Alluded

    to refer casually or indirectly; make an (usually followed by to): He often alluded to his poverty. to contain a casual or indirect reference (usually followed by to): The letter alludes to something now forgotten. Contemporary Examples But last month, Mousavi alluded to them, suggesting that his cabinet was kept in the dark. Mysterious Letter […]

  • Allure

    to attract or tempt by something flattering or desirable. to fascinate; charm. to be attractive or tempting. fascination; charm; appeal. . a passageway, as the walk along one side of a cloister. Contemporary Examples Not even a mediocre film can erase the allure of the great romance of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. The Liz […]



  • Allured

    to attract or tempt by something flattering or desirable. to fascinate; charm. to be attractive or tempting. fascination; charm; appeal. Historical Examples You would be astounded to learn how many ruined women are wives who have been allured to sin. Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls Various She was not allured, hardly tempted, by the […]

  • Allurement

    fascination; charm. the means of . the act or process of . Historical Examples How true was this dream of theirs gathering detail and allurement as it passed from sire to son! A Man for the Ages Irving Bacheller “If I give her to them, she will never be a widow,” was the allurement there. […]



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