very attractive or tempting; enticing; seductive.
fascinating; charming.
to attract or tempt by something flattering or desirable.
to fascinate; charm.
to be attractive or tempting.
fascination; charm; appeal.
Contemporary Examples

Downtown darling Vena Cava showed off a structured collection, full of modern lines and alluring glimpses of skin.
Fashion Takes a Bow The Daily Beast September 11, 2009

This scary, but sort of alluring killer named Jigsaw has put them there.
Saw, Scrutinized Choire Sicha October 22, 2009

But there are alluring indications that regular, vigorous water activity may indeed extend human life.
Swimming to Health? Excerpt of Lynn Sherr’s ‘Swim: Why We Love the Water’ Lynn Sherr April 7, 2012

Among the ghosts in that alluring photo is Harold L. “Doc” Humes, dapper in suit, vest, and bow tie.
Plimpton’s Crazy Co-Conspirator Ronald K. Fried December 7, 2008

A lot of girls become models because there is the alluring, if distant, promise of first-class, all-designer everything.
The Price of ‘Free’: Models Moonlighting as Escorts Anonymous March 14, 2014

Historical Examples

No trace of the alluring scent could he catch, though he eagerly nosed all about the tree and even partly up the trunk.
Followers of the Trail Zoe Meyer

I can turn a deaf ear to enticements the most alluring, and sounds the most insinuating.
Imogen William Godwin

When the poplars grew green, he could not stay at home: the alluring picture filled his dreams and took captive all his thoughts.
Timar’s Two Worlds Mr Jkai

Even the Gothic Christians were seduced by these alluring refinements.
A Short History of Spain Mary Platt Parmele

If they droop and are grayish white, avoid touching the tree, no matter how alluring the wonderful scarlet foliage is.
Trees Worth Knowing Julia Ellen Rogers

enticing; fascinating; attractive
(transitive) to entice or tempt (someone) to a person or place or to a course of action; attract
attractiveness; appeal: the cottage’s allure was its isolation

1530s, “action of attracting,” verbal noun from allure (v.).

“appealing to desires,” 1570s, present participle adjective from allure (v.). Related: Alluringly.

c.1400, from Anglo-French alurer, Old French aleurer “to attract, captivate; train a falcon to hunt,” from à “to” (see ad-) + loirre “falconer’s lure,” from a Frankish word (see lure), perhaps influenced by French allure “gait, way of walking.” Related: Allured; alluring. The noun is first attested 1540s; properly this sense is allurement.


Read Also:

  • Alluringly

    very attractive or tempting; enticing; seductive. fascinating; charming. Historical Examples The sun shone warm and bright; the chinook blew balmily and alluringly; the trail stretched before us dry and level. Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1909 to 1922 Lucy Maud Montgomery Might their melodies not strike freshly and alluringly on the ear to-day? A Boswell […]

  • Allus.

    allus. allusion allusively

  • Allusion

    a passing or casual reference; an incidental mention of something, either directly or by implication: The novel’s title is an allusion to Shakespeare. the act of ; the making of a casual or indirect reference to something: The Bible is a fertile source of allusion in art. Obsolete. a metaphor or parable. Contemporary Examples From […]

  • Allusive

    having reference to something implied or inferred; containing, abounding in, or characterized by . Obsolete. metaphorical; symbolic; figurative. Contemporary Examples This is about as explicit as 1Q84 ever gets, and even here the sense of things is allusive. Murakami’s Dreamy Return Malcolm Jones November 3, 2011 Historical Examples This follows from the allusive way in […]

Disclaimer: Alluring definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.