Altered



to make different in some particular, as size, style, course, or the like; modify:
to alter a coat; to alter a will; to alter course.
to castrate or spay.
to change; become different or modified.
Contemporary Examples

The euphemism of losing “situational awareness” could be an evasive way of describing just this altered state.
The New Cockpit Threat Clive Irving October 21, 2009

Democrats, their backs up, have altered Senate rules on filibusters in the face of Republican obstruction.
The South Has Indeed Risen Again and It’s Called the Tea Party Jack Schwartz December 7, 2013

I was reminded of A Christmas Carol, when Scrooge is allowed to see his own life, altered.
George Clooney Saved My Novel Walter Kirn December 8, 2009

The tenor of the briefing room made clear just how fundamentally the GOP has altered the terms of political debate.
White House Admits Obama Error! Howard Kurtz April 10, 2011

Both verify that the ad ran on Grindr and has not been edited or altered in any way.
A Tom Cotton Ad on Grindr? Ben Jacobs October 28, 2014

Historical Examples

The chill presence of death has altered the aspect of everything.
The Browning Cyclopdia Edward Berdoe

I am an altered man, Margaret—you cannot conceive how altered since I began to know you.
Deerbrook Harriet Martineau

The composition of this force showed the altered conditions of warfare.
A Handbook of the Boer War Gale and Polden, Limited

For these causes, one or both, I think the lines should be altered.
Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott, Volume V (of 10) John Gibson Lockhart

But now, to see how things are altered, any man of sense would reply, ‘What should he want with my great-grandmother’s shin-bone?
The Posthumous Works of Thomas De Quincey, Vol. 1 (2 vols) Thomas De Quincey

verb
to make or become different in some respect; change
(transitive) (informal, mainly US) a euphemistic word for castrate, spay
v.

late 14c., “to change (something),” from Old French alterer “change, alter,” from Medieval Latin alterare “to change,” from Latin alter “the other (of the two),” from PIE *al- “beyond” (see alias (adv.)) + comparative suffix -ter (cf. other). Intransitive sense “to become otherwise” first recorded 1580s. Related: Altered; altering.

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  • Altered chord

    a chord in which at least one tone has been changed from its normal pitch in the key. noun (music) a chord in which one or more notes are chromatically changed by the introduction of accidentals

  • Altered state

    noun any state of mind differing from the normal state of consciousness of a person, esp. one induced by drugs, hypnosis, or mental disorder Examples An altered state of mind is any condition which is significantly different from a normative waking beta wave. Word Origin 1893 Contemporary Examples The euphemism of losing “situational awareness” could […]



  • Altered state of consciousness

    any modification of the normal state of consciousness or awareness, including drowsiness or sleep and also states created by the use of alcohol, drugs, hypnosis, or techniques of meditation.

  • Alterer

    to make different in some particular, as size, style, course, or the like; modify: to alter a coat; to alter a will; to alter course. to castrate or spay. to change; become different or modified. verb to make or become different in some respect; change (transitive) (informal, mainly US) a euphemistic word for castrate, spay […]



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