in spite of the fact that; even though; though.
Contemporary Examples

A Los Angeles judge revoked her probation and Lohan was brought to jail, although she was released later that day on bail.
Lindsay Lohan and Rehab: A Look at Their Long-Term Relationship Rachel Osman July 31, 2013

although this is a notoriously difficult checkpoint, security was tightened for the arrival of the American president.
Obama’s Reception In Israel—And Mine Anna Lekas Miller March 19, 2013

“although I have never been to Afghanistan, I know it is a dangerous place, particularly for women,” she says.
Afghan Actress Gihana Khan Braves Bollywood Sami Yousafzai, Ron Moreau December 26, 2012

No Israeli casualties have been reported thus far, although one man was reportedly seriously injured when a rocket struck his car.
Numbers Don’t Tell the Mideast Story Thane Rosenbaum July 9, 2014

although fair use is a complicated and subjective issue, copyright lawyers say Gawker has a tough case ahead of them.
The Legal Brawl Over Palin’s Book Shushannah Walshe November 21, 2010

Historical Examples

The anger had ebbed from Dan’s brain, although his attitude had not relaxed.
The Destroyer Burton Egbert Stevenson

The good woman, although low in circumstance, is great in mind!
Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

I read Astounding Stories all the time, although I’m just a boy.
Astounding Stories of Super-Science, October, 1930 Various

I am sure it was not thus my fault you had not, although you treat me thus.
Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

We gave her a good run, although it was not altogether in the sun.
A Jolly Fellowship Frank R. Stockton

(subordinating) despite the fact that; even though: although she was ill, she worked hard

early 14c., althagh, compound of all + though, showing once-common emphatic use of all. “All though was originally more emphatic than though, but by 1400 it was practically only a variant of it, and all having thus lost its independent force, the phrase was written as one word” [OED].


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