an imaginary, undying flower.
any plant of the genus Amaranthus, some species of which are cultivated as food and some for their showy flower clusters or foliage.
Compare .
Chemistry. a purplish-red, water-soluble powder, C 20 H 11 N 2 O 10 Na 3 , an azo dye used chiefly to color pharmaceuticals, food, and garments.
Contemporary Examples

Look for:Purchase breads containing seeds and a mixture of healthy grains (like millet and amaranth) other than just brown rice.
How to Buy Gluten-Free Without Getting Duped DailyBurn April 11, 2014

Historical Examples

The amaranth wreath will in thy grasp be changed to one of roses, more fragrant indeed, but withering with a single sun!
Life Without and Life Within Margaret Fuller

Their heads were crowned with garlands of amaranth and roses.
Imogen William Godwin

For amaranth, the cotton is strongly galled, dried, and washed.
A Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures and Mines Andrew Ure

In his case the amaranth had been grafted in, and the plant was blossoming again.
Earl Hubert’s Daughter Emily Sarah Holt

Evie went half wild with joy about a certain crystal bath; I about the amaranth Room.
The Debit Account Oliver Onions

Are there really fields of amaranth for those who can find them?
Drolls From Shadowland J. H. Pearce

And then the crowns of amaranth held over their heads by the applauding angels!
Citation and Examination of William Shakspeare Walter Savage Landor

The amaranth was her chosen emblem, and “Non moritura” her motto.
The Duchess of Trajetto Anne Manning

For two months of the twelve, when the heather is in blossom, all that chase is a glowing reach of amaranth and purple.
Cradock Nowell, Vol. 1 (of 3) Richard Doddridge Blackmore

(poetic) an imaginary flower that never fades
any of numerous tropical and temperate plants of the genus Amaranthus, having tassel-like heads of small green, red, or purple flowers: family Amaranthaceae See also love-lies-bleeding, tumbleweed, pigweed (sense 1)
a synthetic red food colouring (E123), used in packet soups, cake mixes, etc

1610s, from French amarante, from Latin amarantus, from Greek amarantos, name of an unfading flower, literally “everlasting,” from a- “not” + stem of marainein “die away, waste away, quench, extinguish,” from PIE *mer- “to rub away, harm” (see nightmare). In classical use, a poet’s word for an imaginary flower that never fades. It was applied to a genus of ornamental plants 1550s. Ending influenced by plant names with Greek -anthos “flower.”


Read Also:

  • Amaranth family

    the plant family Amaranthaceae, typified by herbaceous, often weedy plants having alternate or opposite leaves and small, chaffy flowers without petals in brightly colored dense clusters, including the cockscomb, pigweed, and amaranth.

  • Amadous

    a spongy substance prepared from fungi, Polyporus (Fomes) fomentarius and allied species, growing on trees, used as tinder and in surgery. noun a spongy substance made from certain fungi, such as Polyporus (or Fomes) fomentarius and related species, used as tinder to light fires, in medicine to stop bleeding, and, esp formerly, by anglers to […]

  • Amaranthaceous

    belonging to the plant family Amaranthaceae. adjective of, relating to, or belonging to the Amaranthaceae (or Amarantaceae), a family of tropical and temperate herbaceous or shrubby flowering plants that includes the amaranths and cockscomb

  • Amaranthine

    of or like the . unfading; everlasting: a woman of amaranthine loveliness. of purplish-red color. Historical Examples It made him jealous to imagine them lost in this amaranthine profundity. Sinister Street, vol. 2 Compton Mackenzie On the sculptor’s side, the amaranthine flower was already in full blow. The Marble Faun, Volume II. Nathaniel Hawthorne Could […]

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