Amass



to gather for oneself; collect as one’s own:
to amass a huge amount of money.
to collect into a mass or pile; gather:
He amassed his papers for his memoirs.
to come together; assemble:
crowds amassing for the parade.
Contemporary Examples

Like other nascent “capitalists,” Khodorkovsky benefited from corrupt ties to government officials to amass phenomenal wealth.
The End to Russian Democracy David Satter December 30, 2010

If indeed the suit was a gamble by the Jackson matriarch to amass a sizable bank account of her own, it did not pay off.
Sorry, Mrs. Jackson: How the King of Pop’s Mother Lost Her Billion-Dollar Lawsuit Diane Dimond October 2, 2013

They will amass forces big enough to overwhelm one of the combat outposts, then wait for the outpost to call for reinforcements.
The Taliban’s Bait Game John Barry August 11, 2011

Absent the NCAA, such a student would be able to amass significant cash during a college career.
End College Football Noah Kristula-Green July 12, 2012

Black used his prominent standing within the hate movement to amass a following of his own.
Derek Black, the Reluctant Racist, and His Exit From White Nationalism Caitlin Dickson July 28, 2013

Historical Examples

By these means she contrived to keep out of debt, and amass a little sum besides.
Little Bessie, the Careless Girl Josephine Franklin

His was the distinction of being the only Pendarves who had ever managed to amass a fortune.
McClure’s Magazine, Vol 31, No 2, June 1908 Various

Each official during his tenure of office expected to recover his initial outlay, and amass a small fortune besides.
The Buccaneers in the West Indies in the XVII Century Clarence Henry Haring

How then, shall we estimate the share of each in the riches which ALL contribute to amass?
The Conquest of Bread Peter Kropotkin

In this expedition, he cruelly oppressed the provinces through which he passed, that he might amass riches.
A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. IV. Robert Kerr

verb
(transitive) to accumulate or collect (esp riches, etc)
to gather in a heap; bring together
v.

late 15c., “to heap up for oneself,” from Old French amasser, from à “to” (see ad-) + masser (see mass (n.1)). Related: Amassed; amassing.

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  • Amassed

    to gather for oneself; collect as one’s own: to amass a huge amount of money. to collect into a mass or pile; gather: He amassed his papers for his memoirs. to come together; assemble: crowds amassing for the parade. Contemporary Examples The administration has amassed not just a middling or even moderately bad foreign-policy record, […]

  • Amassing

    to gather for oneself; collect as one’s own: to amass a huge amount of money. to collect into a mass or pile; gather: He amassed his papers for his memoirs. to come together; assemble: crowds amassing for the parade. Contemporary Examples They’re not about amassing medals, so much as engendering goodwill; less cut-throat competition, more […]



  • Amassment

    to gather for oneself; collect as one’s own: to amass a huge amount of money. to collect into a mass or pile; gather: He amassed his papers for his memoirs. to come together; assemble: crowds amassing for the parade. Historical Examples The struggle for the first nickel had been wearing and wearying, but the amassment […]

  • Amastia

    n. medical Latin, from Greek amastos “without breasts,” from privative prefix a- (see a- (3)) + mastos “breast” (see masto-) + -ia. amastia a·mas·ti·a (ā-mās’tē-ə, ə-mās’-) n. Congenital absence of one or both breasts. Also called amazia.



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