Amassing



to gather for oneself; collect as one’s own:
to amass a huge amount of money.
to collect into a mass or pile; gather:
He amassed his papers for his memoirs.
to come together; assemble:
crowds amassing for the parade.
Contemporary Examples

They’re not about amassing medals, so much as engendering goodwill; less cut-throat competition, more track and fealty.
Kiss the…Queen’s Baton? The British Empire Is Alive and Well Debra A. Klein May 26, 2014

And Iran may be just months away from amassing enough weapons-grade uranium to wipe Israel off the map.
Mark McKinnon on Obama’s Absurd Big Bird Attack Mark McKinnon October 10, 2012

But together they are quite the pair, amassing nearly 25 million followers on Instagram alone.
Kendall Tries to Outdo Kim by Straddling Cara Delevingne in Love Magazine Lizzie Crocker December 2, 2014

Suddenly it is dawning on everyone, including members of Congress, just how much power Facebook is amassing.
Facebook Woos Washington Dan Lyons April 19, 2011

Is Mr. Mubarak going to be investigated for amassing illegal wealth?
How Al Jazeera Shook Its “Terror TV” Label The Daily Beast February 12, 2011

Historical Examples

Even if he were successful in amassing wealth untold, yet they two must be as far apart as ever.
The Sign of the Spider Bertram Mitford

We have been amassing wealth too often selfishly, and madly.
Complete Story of the San Francisco Horror Richard Linthicum

Sole dispenser of money, it cannot omit the oldest and most obvious means of amassing wealth by the flux and reflux of paper.
Thirty Years’ View (Vol. I of 2) Thomas Hart Benton

He pushed his mercantile business for years, amassing an immense fortune.
Hidden Treasures Harry A. Lewis

Mike took John down to his coal-docks, with which he was amassing a fortune, and explained their workings.
The Grain Ship Morgan Robertson

verb
(transitive) to accumulate or collect (esp riches, etc)
to gather in a heap; bring together
v.

late 15c., “to heap up for oneself,” from Old French amasser, from à “to” (see ad-) + masser (see mass (n.1)). Related: Amassed; amassing.

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  • Amassment

    to gather for oneself; collect as one’s own: to amass a huge amount of money. to collect into a mass or pile; gather: He amassed his papers for his memoirs. to come together; assemble: crowds amassing for the parade. Historical Examples The struggle for the first nickel had been wearing and wearying, but the amassment […]

  • Amastia

    n. medical Latin, from Greek amastos “without breasts,” from privative prefix a- (see a- (3)) + mastos “breast” (see masto-) + -ia. amastia a·mas·ti·a (ā-mās’tē-ə, ə-mās’-) n. Congenital absence of one or both breasts. Also called amazia.



  • Amata

    the mother, by Latinus, of Lavinia. Historical Examples The Fury first took possession of the queen, Amata, and roused her to oppose in every way the new alliance. The Classic Myths in English Literature and in Art (2nd ed.) (1911) Charles Mills Gayley His “Amata Mathemata” became his pride, his pleasure, and at length his […]

  • Amastigote

    amastigote amastigote a·mas·ti·gote (ə-mās’tĭ-gōt’) n. See Leishman-Donovan body.



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