Ambled



to go at a slow, easy pace; stroll; saunter:
He ambled around the town.
(of a horse) to go at a slow pace with the legs moving in lateral pairs and usually having a four-beat rhythm.
an ambling gait.
a slow, easy walk or gentle pace.
a stroll.
Contemporary Examples

He ambled into the main auditorium, telling me he was exhausted, while Newt Gingrich wrapped up a snooze of a speech.
Michele Bachmann Saves Day Three of CPAC Caitlin Dickson March 15, 2013

Historical Examples

At our third shout he ambled clumsily off, while Mr. Oliver, with a basket of buns in his hand, pursued him down the street.
The Believing Years Edmund Lester Pearson

She wheeled her horse, and, side by side, they ambled up the dusty road.
Mistress Wilding Rafael Sabatini

McTurk ambled round the corner, with a roving eye on all possible horizons.
Stalky & Co. Rudyard Kipling

He ambled up to Ross, who was busily shovelling in the earth.
The Boy with the U. S. Weather Men Francis William Rolt-Wheeler

How easily they ambled, limbs and will working in perfect harmony!
John Brown Captain R. W. Campbell

And Pete dropped the mower and ambled up to the office-door.
In Apple-Blossom Time Clara Louise Burnham

So he pulled up and stood still till the other one had ambled past, and then he whirled out into the trail and swung his loop.
The Happy Family Bertha Muzzy Bower

Pete ambled over the threshold and curled down by the stove.
The Secret of the Storm Country Grace Miller White

Then, with an effort, he struggled out of bed and ambled into the bathroom.
This Side of Paradise F. Scott Fitzgerald

verb (intransitive)
to walk at a leisurely relaxed pace
(of a horse) to move slowly, lifting both legs on one side together
to ride a horse at an amble or leisurely pace
noun
a leisurely motion in walking
a leisurely walk
the ambling gait of a horse
v.

early 14c., from Old French ambler “walk as a horse does,” from Latin ambulare “to walk, to go about, take a walk,” perhaps a compound of ambi- “around” (see ambi-) and -ulare, from PIE root *el- “to go” (cf. Greek ale “wandering,” alaomai “wander about;” Latvian aluot “go around or astray”). Until 1590s used only of horses or persons on horseback. Related: Ambled; ambling. As a noun, from late 14c.

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