Ambulant



moving from place to place; itinerant; shifting.
Medicine/Medical, (def 4).
Historical Examples

Thus do the ambulant images of God cloak their shackles proudly, and divert the judicious with their boastful shouts.
In Defense of Women H. L. Mencken

The encounter with these ambulant Highnesses had been fatal—Lansing now perceived it—to Mrs. Hicks’s principles.
The Glimpses of the Moon Edith Wharton

Once with the title stamped on his memory, the zealous Irishman might be trusted to become an ambulant advertizer.
Diana of the Crossways, Complete George Meredith

Formerly people were content to paste them up; now they are ambulant.
Tour in England, Ireland, and France, in the years 1826, 1827, 1828 and 1829. Hermann Pckler-Muskau

And from every direction rose the vehement street calls of ambulant venders of the necessaries of Neapolitan life.
A Spirit in Prison Robert Hichens

There is another class of ambulant merchant who is a frequenter of this most animated of Tunis native quarter.
In the Land of Mosques & Minarets Francis Miltoun

At first it occurred to me that it might be an ambulant dog-kennel, to receive the hounds on their return.
Arthur O’Leary Charles James Lever

In Fig. 76 an ambulant secretary or public writer is seated at his little table, on which are the meager tools of his trade.
Sign Language Among North American Indians Compared With That Among Other Peoples And Deaf-Mutes Garrick Mallery

Thus we describe certain cases as ambulant, abortive, larval and fulminant.
Plague Thomas Wright Jackson

Fifth Avenue had been an ambulant Louvre of young mistresses, not of old masters.
What Will People Say? Rupert Hughes

adjective
moving about from place to place
(med) another word for ambulatory (sense 3)
adj.

1610s, from Latin ambulantem (nominative ambulans), present participle of ambulare (see amble). Of diseases, denoting cases in which the patient may be up and around, by 1913.

ambulant am·bu·lant (ām’byə-lənt)
adj.
Moving or walking about.

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    to walk about or move from place to place. Historical Examples Give me half-a-guinea for my trouble, sir, and I’ll ambulate you through lanes every fut o’ the way. Handy Andy, Volume 2 (of 2) Samuel Lover verb (intransitive) to wander about or move from one place to another v. 1620s, from Latin ambulatus, past […]



  • Ambulation

    to walk about or move from place to place. Historical Examples Among the devices before touched upon, in the way of ambulation, was one which amused us excessively. Los Gringos H. A. (Henry Agustus) Wise verb (intransitive) to wander about or move from one place to another n. 1540s, from Latin ambulationem (nominative ambulatio), noun […]

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    to walk about or move from place to place. Historical Examples And the novelty of the ambulator bands on pedestrian levels was still strong for native New Yorkers. The Telenizer Don Thompson verb (intransitive) to wander about or move from one place to another v. 1620s, from Latin ambulatus, past participle of ambulare “to walk” […]



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