Amelia



the congenital absence of one or more limbs.
a female given name: from a Germanic word meaning “industrious.”.
Contemporary Examples

amelia Smith moved from San Francisco to Paris in 1997, all the better to write about travel, food and culture without borders.
A Superstar Chef Does the Unthinkable Amelia Smith November 16, 2008

The house decays around amelia and Samuel, their world narrows and becomes mad, undealable with.
Grief: The Real Monster in The Babadook Tim Teeman December 18, 2014

In 2014 we have suddenly lurched backward to 1937 and the world of amelia Earhart.
How Flight 370 Could Have Become a Zombie Clive Irving March 18, 2014

As a 32-year-old new mother, amelia Mattocks is on duty around the clock these days.
American Moms: Unsung Heroes of a Bad Economy Leslie Bennetts December 14, 2011

Tiny, pretty, and daring, Coleman merited frequent comparison to her white contemporary “aviatrix,” amelia Earhart.
Red Tails Overlooks the Story of America’s First Black Pilots Marc Wortman January 15, 2012

Historical Examples

He lifted his brows, pursing his lips whimsically; and amelia laughed.
Tiverton Tales Alice Brown

She would leave amelia to have the pleasure of showing them the grounds.
Tales And Novels, Volume 5 (of 10) Maria Edgeworth

amelia, Charlotte, and Hatty set forth on Tuesday, and they are gone.
Out in the Forty-Five Emily Sarah Holt

But don’t read it till you are out of my sight—Is amelia up?
Tales And Novels, Volume 5 (of 10) Maria Edgeworth

Then amelia and George went right to work and fixed up the house.
By the Light of the Soul Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

noun
(pathol) the congenital absence of arms or legs

fem. proper name, of Germanic origin, literally “laborious” (cf. Old Norse ama “to trouble”), later assimilated with Roman gens name Aemilia.

amelia a·mel·i·a (ə-měl’ē-ə, ə-mē’lē-ə)
n.
Congenital absence of one or more limbs.

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