Ammonium



the univalent ion, NH 4 + , or group, NH 4 , which plays the part of a metal in the salt formed when ammonia reacts with an acid.
Contemporary Examples

ammonium nitrate is extremely common, and pretty dangerous, and also extremely useful.
The Most Dangerous Substance in America May Be Fertilizer Megan McArdle April 18, 2013

Historical Examples

A solution is produced which contains ferric hydrate dissolved in ferric chloride, with free chloride of ammonium.
Cooley’s Practical Receipts, Volume II Arnold Cooley

The solution may be regarded as containing the ammonium cellulose xanthate.
Researches on Cellulose C. F. Cross

The solution is filtered off, boiled till free of sulphuretted hydrogen, and ammonium chloride and ammonia added.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 1 Various

On account of the formation of an ammonium salt in the reaction.
The Elements of Qualitative Chemical Analysis, vol. 1, parts 1 and 2. Julius Stieglitz

The hexamethylenamin present is doubtless produced by the action of the paraformaldehyd on the ammonium chlorid present.
The Propaganda for Reform in Proprietary Medicines, Vol. 2 of 2 Various

Do not mistake the fumes of the acid for those of ammonium chlorid.
Detection of the Common Food Adulterants Edwin M. Bruce

Stir the cloth in water to remove the acid and dissolve the color by boiling in a solution of ammonium hydroxid (1 to 50).
Detection of the Common Food Adulterants Edwin M. Bruce

An aqueous solution in the cold is not precipitated by oxalate of ammonium.
Cooley’s Practical Receipts, Volume II Arnold Cooley

Ask for “citrate of iron and ammonium” when buying the ingredients for the formula.
Harper’s Round Table, August 27, 1895 Various

noun
(modifier) of, consisting of, or containing the monovalent group NH4– or the ion NH4+: ammonium compounds

ammonium am·mo·ni·um (ə-mō’nē-əm)
n.
The univalent radical NH4+, that is derived from ammonia and that reacts as a univalent metal in forming ammonium compounds.
ammonium
(ə-mō’nē-əm)
A positively charged ion, NH4, derived from ammonia and found in a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Compounds of ammonium chemically resemble the alkali metals.

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  • Ammonium acetate

    a white, crystalline, deliquescent, water-soluble solid, NH 4 (C 2 H 3 O 2), used chiefly in the manufacture of dyes and meat preservatives. Historical Examples To determine the presence of lead some of the powder was extracted with ammonium acetate solution. The Propaganda for Reform in Proprietary Medicines, Vol. 2 of 2 Various Lead […]

  • Ammonium alum

    . a crystalline solid, AlNH 4 (SO 4) 2 ⋅12H 2 O, used chiefly as a size in the manufacture of paper; alum.



  • Ammonium bicarbonate

    a white, crystalline, water-soluble solid, NH 4 HCO 3 , used chiefly in the manufacture of baking powder. Historical Examples The original patents on the use of ammonium bicarbonate have, we understand, long since expired. Scientific American Supplement, No. 611, September 17, 1887 Various In the Solvay method of manufacture sodium chloride (common salt) and […]

  • Ammonium bifluoride

    a white, crystalline, water-soluble, poisonous solid, NH 4 HF 2 , used chiefly for cleaning and sterilizing brewing and dairy equipment.



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