Amphibian



any cold-blooded vertebrate of the class Amphibia, comprising frogs and toads, newts and salamanders, and caecilians, the larvae being typically aquatic, breathing by gills, and the adults being typically semiterrestrial, breathing by lungs and through the moist, glandular skin.
an plant.
an airplane designed for taking off from and landing on both land and water.
Also called amtrac. a flat-bottomed, armed, military vehicle, equipped with both tracks and a rudder, that can travel either on land or in water, used chiefly for landing assault troops.
belonging or pertaining to the Amphibia.
(def 2).
Historical Examples

It was toward this that the pilot of the amphibian nosed his craft.
Agent Nine Solves His First Case Graham M. Dean

Bell had a raft of canes afloat beside the amphibian when she waked.
Astounding Stories of Super-Science, June, 1930 Various

The specimens consist of fish, insects, and amphibian reptiles.
The Catholic World. Volume III; Numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. E. Rameur

And then we have still the amphibian, the lizard, and the bird or mammal, up to man.
Socialism: Positive and Negative Robert Rives La Monte

Thus the salamander, an amphibian of the newt family, brings forth its young in adult condition without gills.
The Old Riddle and the Newest Answer John Gerard

But I do think it wise to keep the story of the amphibian and its pilot to ourselves.
Dorothy Dixon and the Mystery Plane Dorothy Wayne

The Talune kept swerving like an impatient horse, waiting for the arrival of that amphibian.
The Pacific Triangle Sydney Greenbie

In fact, he did not want the general to know they were going out with the amphibian.
A Yankee Flier in Italy Rutherford G. Montgomery

For a moment or two he stood there watching her amphibian taxi away from the hangar, gathering speed as it went.
Dorothy Dixon and the Mystery Plane Dorothy Wayne

Thus must the first amphibian have climbed into the thin air.
Jungle Peace William Beebe

noun
any cold-blooded vertebrate of the class Amphibia, typically living on land but breeding in water. Their aquatic larvae (tadpoles) undergo metamorphosis into the adult form. The class includes the newts and salamanders, frogs and toads, and caecilians
a type of aircraft able to land and take off from both water and land
any vehicle able to travel on both water and land
adjective
another word for amphibious
of, relating to, or belonging to the class Amphibia
adj.

1630s, “having two modes of existence, of doubtful nature,” from Greek amphibia, neuter plural of amphibios “living a double life,” from amphi- “of both kinds” (see amphi-) + bios “life” (see bio-).

Formerly used by zoologists to describe all sorts of combined natures (including otters and seals), the biological sense “class of animals between fishes and reptiles that live both on land and in water” and the noun derivative both are first recorded 1835. Amphibia was used in this sense from c.1600 and has been a zoological classification since c.1819.
amphibian
(ām-fĭb’ē-ən)
A cold-blooded, smooth-skinned vertebrate of the class Amphibia. Amphibians hatch as aquatic larvae with gills and, in most species, then undergo metamorphosis into four-legged terrestrial adults with lungs for breathing air. The eggs of amphibians are fertilized externally and lack an amnion. Amphibians evolved from lobe-finned fish during the late Devonian Period and include frogs, toads, newts, salamanders, and caecilians.

Our Living Language : Amphibians, not quite fish and not quite reptiles, were the first vertebrates to live on land. These cold-blooded animals spend their larval stage in water, breathing through their gills. In adulthood they usually live on land, using their lungs to breath air. This double life is also at the root of their name, amphibian, which, like many scientific words, derives from Greek. The Greek prefix amphi- means “both,” or “double,” and the Greek word bios means “life.” Both these elements are widely used in English scientific terminology: bios, for example, is seen in such words as biology, antibiotic, and symbiotic.

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  • Amphibians

    any cold-blooded vertebrate of the class Amphibia, comprising frogs and toads, newts and salamanders, and caecilians, the larvae being typically aquatic, breathing by gills, and the adults being typically semiterrestrial, breathing by lungs and through the moist, glandular skin. an plant. an airplane designed for taking off from and landing on both land and water. […]

  • Amphibiotic

    living on land during the adult stage and in water during a larval stage. adjective having an aquatic larval form and a terrestrial adult form, as amphibians



  • Amphibious

    living or able to live both on land and in water; belonging to both land and water. Also, amphibian. capable of operating on both land and water: amphibious vehicles. of or relating to military operations by both land and naval forces against the same object, especially to a military attack by troops landed by naval […]

  • Amphiblastic

    adjective (of animal ova) showing complete but unequal cleavage after fertilization



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