Angered



a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire.
Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore.
Obsolete. grief; trouble.
to arouse anger or wrath in.
Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame.
to become :
He angers with little provocation.
Contemporary Examples

He also angered gay rights activists when he quipped, “Isn’t it better to like beautiful women than to be gay?”
Will Berlusconi Get the Boot? Barbie Latza Nadeau November 6, 2010

Many Syrians, meanwhile, are angered by what they perceive as U.S. indifference to their suffering.
Post Election, Obama Gambles on Syrian Rebels Mike Giglio November 9, 2012

But Daley, a man of many grudges, was angered when the gun bill went down to defeat by a tiny margin.
Who You Calling Second City? Scott Turow October 30, 2008

The Monopoly-style “Ghettopoly” board game was drenched in racial stereotypes, and angered the NAACP.
Who Designed Urban Outfitters’s Bloody Kent State Shirt? They Won’t Say Asawin Suebsaeng September 14, 2014

Patton is angered by the “outrageous” lack of care veterans face when they return home.
The Price of Being a Patton: Wrestling With the Legacy of America’s Most Famous General Tim Teeman May 25, 2014

Historical Examples

The desertion of the king appears to have terrified rather than angered the nation.
An Introduction to the History of Western Europe James Harvey Robinson

Allis’s quick eye caught his expression of amused discontent; it angered her.
Thoroughbreds W. A. Fraser

It would have angered her from another; from him it touched her to find how closely and kindly he had watched her.
Heartsease Charlotte M. Yonge

angered at the situation and humiliated by what I had said, I was on the point of leaving at once.
City of Endless Night Milo Hastings

But that angered me, for I had mastered my Physics before he was ever born.
The Coming of the Ice G. Peyton Wertenbaker

noun
a feeling of great annoyance or antagonism as the result of some real or supposed grievance; rage; wrath
verb
(transitive) to make angry; enrage
v.

c.1200, “to irritate, annoy, provoke,” from Old Norse angra “to grieve, vex, distress; to be vexed at, take offense with,” from Proto-Germanic *angus (cf. Old English enge “narrow, painful,” Middle Dutch enghe, Gothic aggwus “narrow”), from PIE root *angh- “tight, painfully constricted, painful” (cf. Sanskrit amhu- “narrow,” amhah “anguish;” Armenian anjuk “narrow;” Lithuanian ankstas “narrow;” Greek ankhein “to squeeze,” ankhone “a strangling;” Latin angere “to throttle, torment;” Old Irish cum-ang “straitness, want”). In Middle English, also of physical pain. Meaning “excite to wrath, make angry” is from late 14c. Related: Angered; angering.
n.

mid-13c., “distress, suffering; anguish, agony,” also “hostile attitude, ill will, surliness,” from Old Norse angr “distress, grief. sorrow, affliction,” from the same root as anger (v.). Sense of “rage, wrath” is early 14c. Old Norse also had angr-gapi “rash, foolish person;” angr-lauss “free from care;” angr-lyndi “sadness, low spirits.”

the emotion of instant displeasure on account of something evil that presents itself to our view. In itself it is an original susceptibility of our nature, just as love is, and is not necessarily sinful. It may, however, become sinful when causeless, or excessive, or protracted (Matt. 5:22; Eph. 4:26; Col. 3:8). As ascribed to God, it merely denotes his displeasure with sin and with sinners (Ps. 7:11).

see: more in sorrow than in anger

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    a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire. Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore. Obsolete. grief; trouble. to arouse anger or wrath in. Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame. to become : He angers with little provocation. Contemporary Examples He has since edged closer […]

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    the ancient Roman goddess of anguish.



  • Angerly

    Archaic. . Obsolete. hurtfully; painfully. Historical Examples Whan he was come, Mayster Vauasour all angerly sayde: thou knaue, why comest thou nat aweye with my cloke? Shakespeare Jest-Books; Unknown He is taught to stand in his own cceite: & if it be tak away, he angerly axeth for it again. The Education of Children Desiderius […]

  • Angers

    a city in and capital of Maine-et-Loire, in W France. a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire. Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore. Obsolete. grief; trouble. to arouse anger or wrath in. Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame. to become : He angers […]



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